Etymology
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quidnunc (n.)

"gossip-monger, one who is curious to know everything that happens," 1709 (as two words), etymologically "what now?" From Latin quid "what?" (neuter of interrogative pronoun quis "who?" from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns) and nunc "now" (see now), to describe someone forever asking "What's the news?"

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quodlibet (n.)

"a nicety, subtlety," late 14c., "a question proposed in a university for disputation, on any academic topic," from Medieval Latin, literally "what you will, what you please," from quod "what," neuter of qui (from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns) + libet "it pleases" (from PIE root *leubh- "to care, desire, love"). Sense evolution is via the notion of "a scholastic argumentation" upon a subject chosen at will (but usually theological). Related: Quodlibetarian; quodlibetic; quodlibetical.

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Sauk (1)

a native people of what is now the U.S. Midwest, 1722, an alternative writing of Sac (q.v.).

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haggaday (n.)
mid-14c., "a kind of door latch," and said to be still the name for rings for raising thumb-latches in the north of England. It appears to be what it looks like: what you say when you open the door ("have good day," as in the 1414 record of them as hafgooddays).
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counterintuitive (adj.)

also counter-intuitive, "contrary to intuition, opposed to what would be expected," 1955, from counter- + intuitive.

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retransmission (n.)

"transmission of what has been received to another destination," 1788, from re- "back, again" + transmission.

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semi-arid (adj.)

also semiarid, "having rather more precipitation than what is arid," 1886, from semi- + arid.

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get (n.)
early 14c., "offspring, child," from get (v.) or beget. Meaning "what is got, booty" is from late 14c.
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neophilia (n.)

"love of novelty, fondness for what is new, strange, or unaccustomed," 1921; see neo- "new" + -philia.

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vestigial (adj.)
1850, "like a mere trace of what has been," originally in biology, from vestige + -al (1).
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