Etymology
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imbue (v.)
early 15c., "to keep wet; to soak, saturate;" also figuratively "to cause to absorb" (feelings, opinions, etc.), from Latin imbuere "moisten, wet, soak, saturate," figuratively "to fill; to taint," a word of uncertain origin, perhaps from the same root as imbrication. Compare also Old French embu, past participle of emboivre, from Latin imbibere "drink in, soak in" (see imbibe), which might have influenced the English word. Related: Imbued; imbuing.
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atmo- 
word-forming element meaning "vapor," from Greek atmos "vapor, steam," from PIE *awet-mo-, from root *wet- (1) "to blow" (also "to inspire, spiritually arouse;" see wood (adj.)).
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undulant (adj.)
1830, from Latin undulantem (nominative undulans), from unda "a wave," from PIE *unda-, nasalized form of root *wed- (1) "water; wet."
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moist (adj.)

late 14c., "slightly wet; well-irrigated, characterized by moistness," from Old French moiste "damp, wet, soaked" (13c., Modern French moite), which is of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Vulgar Latin *muscidus "moldy," also "wet," from Latin mucidus "slimy, moldy, musty," from mucus "slime" (see mucus). Alternative etymology [Diez] is from Latin musteus "fresh, green, new," literally "like new wine," from musteum "new wine" (see must (n.1)). If this wasn't the source, it influenced the form of the other word in Old French. Related: Moistly; moistness (mid-14c.).

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slosh (v.)
"to splash about in mud or wet," 1844, from slosh (n.). Meaning "to pour carelessly" is recorded from 1875. Related: Sloshed; sloshing.
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undulation (n.)
1640s, from Medieval Latin *undulatio, from Late Latin undulatus "wavy, undulated," from undula "wavelet," diminutive of Latin unda "a wave," from PIE *unda-, nasalized form of root *wed- (1) "water; wet."
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hygrology (n.)

"science of bodily humors," 1787, from French or German hygrologie, which are earlier, or from hygro- "wet, moist; moisture" + -logy.

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embrocate (v.)

"moisten and rub (a bruised or injured part of the body) with a liquid substance," 1610s, from Medieval Latin embrocatus, past participle of embrocare, from Late Latin embrocha, from Greek embrokhe "lotion, fomentation," from embrekhein "to soak in, foment," from assimilated form of en (see en- (2)) + brekhein "to water, wet, rain, send rain," related to brokhe "rain," from PIE root *mergh- "to wet, sprinkle, rain." Related: Embrocated; embrocating; embrocation (early 15c.).

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prurient (adj.)

1630s, "itching," later, and now exclusively, "having an itching desire for something" (1650s), especially "lascivious, inclined to lewd thoughts," (1746), from Latin prurientem (nominative pruriens), present participle of prurire "to itch; to long for, be wanton," which is perhaps related to pruna "glowing coals" (from PIE root *preus- "to freeze; to burn;" see freeze (v.)).

De Vaan suggests a source in PIE *preus-i-, *prus-no-"(cold and) wet; itching," source also of Welsh rhew, Breton rev, reo "frost," Sanskrit prushnuvanti "to (be)sprinkle, wet," and writes that "The meaning 'to be wet, itch' was metaphorically also applied to high temperatures, hence 'burning' in pruna." But it needn't be metaphorical: Cold damage to skin is called ice burn and the paradoxical sensation of burning when the skin contacts an extreme cold surface has long been noted. Related: Pruriently.

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dabble (v.)

1550s, "to dip a little and often," hence "to wet by splashing," probably a frequentative of dab. Figurative sense of "do superficially" attested by 1620s. Related: Dabbled; dabbling. An Ellen Dablewife is in the Lancashire Inquests from 1336.

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