Etymology
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Mandingo 
people of the upper Niger region of West Africa, 1620s.
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chigger (n.)

"minute fle-like insect of the West Indies and South America," 1756, from West Indies chigoe (1660s), possibly from Carib, or from or influenced by words from African languages (such as Wolof and Yoruba jiga "insect").

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Magrib 
"Barbary," from Arabic Maghrib, literally "the west," from gharaba "(the sun) has set."
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spliff (n.)
conical cannabis cigarette, 1936, a West Indian word, of unknown origin.
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obeah (n.)

"sorcery, witchcraft" among Africans in Africa and the West Indies, 1760, from a West African word, such as Efik (southern Nigeria) ubio "a thing or mixture left as a charm to cause sickness or death," Twi ebayifo "witch, wizard, sorcerer."

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tantric (adj.)
1905, from tantra + -ic; used loosely in the West to denote erotic spiritualism.
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Akan 
people and language of West Africa (Ghana and surrounding regions), 1690s, a native name.
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drill (n.4)
"West African baboon species," 1640s, perhaps from a native word (compare mandrill).
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papaya (n.)

1590s of the fruit, 1610s of the tree, from Spanish, probably from Arawakan (West Indies) papaya.

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yam (n.)
1580s, igname (current form by 1690s), from Portuguese inhame or Spanish igname, from a West African language (compare Fulani nyami "to eat;" Twi anyinam "species of yam"); the word in American and Jamaican English probably is directly from West African sources. The Malay name is ubi, whence German öbiswurzel.
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