Etymology
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wrasse (n.)
type of salt-water fish, 1670s, from Cornish wrach, related to Welsh gurach.
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Cambrian (adj.)
1650s, "from or of Wales or the Welsh," from Cambria, variant of Cumbria, Latinized derivation of Cymry, the name of the Welsh for themselves, from Old Celtic Combroges "compatriots." Geological sense (in reference to Paleozoic rocks first studied in Wales and Cumberland) is from 1836.
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Taffy 
characteristic name of a Welshman, c. 1700, from Teifi, Welsh form of Davy (see David).
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Gladys 
fem. proper name, Welsh Gwladys, probably a Brythonified form of Latin Claudia (q.v.).
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lech (n.1)
"Celtic monumental stone," 1768, from Welsh llech, cognate with Gaelic and Irish leac (see cromlech).
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Griffith 
masc. proper name, from Welsh Gruffydd, probably from Latin Rufus, from rufus "red."
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Tudor 
1779 in reference to the English royal family, from Welsh surname Tewdwr, used of the line of English sovereigns from Henry VII to Elizabeth I, descended from Owen Tudor, who married Catherine, widowed queen of Henry V. Applied from 1815 to a style of architecture prevalent during these reigns. The name is the Welsh form of Theodore.
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Enid 
fem. proper name, from Middle Welsh eneit, "purity," literally "soul," from PIE *ane-tyo-, suffixed form of root *ane- "to breathe."
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Llewelyn 
male proper name, from Welsh Llywelin, often explained as "lion-like," but probably from llyw "leader."
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cwm (n.)

"bowl-shaped hollow at the head of a valley," 1853, from Welsh cwm "coomb" (see coomb). Mostly they are formed by glaciers.

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