Etymology
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well-being (n.)
1610s, from well (adv.) + gerundive of be.
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well-born (adj.)
Old English welboren; see well (adv.) + born.
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well-meaning (adj.)
late 14c., from well (adv.) + present participle of mean (v.).
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well-regulated (adj.)
1709 (Shaftsbury), from well (adv.) + past participle of regulate (v.).
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well-ordered (adj.)
c. 1600, from well (adv.) + past participle of order (v.).
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well-heeled (adj.)
"well-off, having much money, in good circumstances;" also "well-equipped," 1872, American English slang (originally in the "money" sense), from well (adv.) + colloquial sense of heeled. "[A]pplied to a player at cards who has a good hand, to a person who possesses plenty of money, or to a man who is well armed" [Century Dictionary]. From 1817 in a literal sense, in reference to shoes.
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well-hung (adj.)
1610s, in male genital sense, from well (adv.) + hung (adj.).
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well-behaved (adj.)
1590s, from well (adv.) + past participle of behave (v.).
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well-done (adj.)
c. 1200, "wise, prudent," from well (adv.) + done. Meaning "thoroughly cooked," in reference to meat, is attested from 1747. Well done! as an exclamation of approval is recorded from mid-15c.
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