Etymology
Advertisement
inro 
1610s, from Japanese, from Chinese yin "seal" + lung "basket." The small ornamental baskets originally held seals, among other small items.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
moorland (n.)

"tract of waste land," Old English morlond; see moor (n.) + land (n.).

Related entries & more 
atrophy (v.)
"to waste away," 1808, from atrophy (n.). Related: Atrophied; atrophying.
Related entries & more 
-cyte 
word-forming element used in modern science to mean "of a cell," from Latinized form of Greek kytos "a hollow, receptacle, basket" (see cyto-).
Related entries & more 
wasted (adj.)
late 14c., "enfeebled," past-participle adjective from waste (v.). Slang meaning "intoxicated" is from 1950s.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
punnet (n.)

"small, round, broad, shallow basket," for displaying fruits or flowers, 1822, chiefly British, of obscure origin.

Related entries & more 
hod (n.)
"portable trough for carrying bricks, mortar, etc.," 1570s, alteration of Middle English hott "pannier" (c. 1300), from Old French hotte "basket to carry on the back," apparently from Frankish *hotta or some other Germanic source (compare Middle High German hotze "cradle"). Altered by influence of cognate Middle Dutch hodde "basket."
Related entries & more 
emaciate (v.)
1620s "cause to lose flesh" (implied in emaciating), from Latin emaciatus, past participle of emaciare "make lean, cause to waste away," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + macies "leanness," from macer "thin" (from PIE root *mak- "long, thin"). Intransitive meaning "become lean, waste away" is from 1640s. Related: Emaciated.
Related entries & more 
canasta (n.)

1945, Uruguayan card game played with two decks and four jokers, popular 1945-c. 1965; from Spanish, literally "basket," from Latin canistrum (see canister). In the game a canasta is seven cards of the same rank, giving the player a large bonus. A Spanish card-playing term for building up a meld was tejiendo las cartas, literally "weaving the cards," hence perhaps the name is based on the image of a woven "basket."

Related entries & more 
ineconomy (n.)
"waste of resources," 1881, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + economy (n.).
Related entries & more 

Page 3