Etymology
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washy (adj.)
1610s, "over-diluted," from wash (n.) + -y (2). Sense of "feeble, weak" is from 1630s. Related: Washiness.
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wash (v.)
Old English wascan "to wash, cleanse, bathe," transitive sense in late Old English, from Proto-Germanic *watskan "to wash" (source also of Old Norse vaska, Middle Dutch wasscen, Dutch wassen, German waschen), from PIE root *wed- (1) "water; wet." Related: Washed; washing.

Used mainly of clothes in Old English (the principal verb for washing the body, dishes, etc. being þwean). Old French gaschier "to stain, soil; soak, wash" (Modern French gâcher) is from Frankish *waskan, from the same Germanic source. Italian guazzare also is a Germanic loan-word. To wash (one's) hands of something is 1550s, from Pilate in Matthew xxvii.24. To wash up "clean utensils after a meal" is from 1751. Washed up "no longer effective" is 1923, theater slang, from notion of washing up at the end of a job.
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washdown (n.)
also wash-down, 1949, from verbal phrase, from wash (v.) + down (adv.).
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wasted (adj.)
late 14c., "enfeebled," past-participle adjective from waste (v.). Slang meaning "intoxicated" is from 1950s.
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waste (adj.)
c. 1300, of land, "desolate, uncultivated," from Anglo-French and Old North French waste (Old French gaste), from Latin vastus "empty, desolate," from PIE *wasto-, extended suffixed form of root *eue- "to leave, abandon, give out." From c. 1400 as "superfluous, excess;" 1670s as "unfit for use." Waste-paper attested from 1580s.
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car-wash (n.)
also carwash, by 1924, "act of washing an automobile," also "commercial establishment where an automobile can be washed," from car (n.) + wash (n.).
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dish-washer (n.)

also dishwasher, mid-15c., "person who washes dishes;" 1867, "apparatus that washes dishes;" from dish (n.) + washer (n.1).

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