Etymology
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northward (adv.)

"toward the north, in a northerly direction," late Old English norþweard; see north + -ward. Northwards, with adverbial genitive, is attested from mid-15c. The adjective northward is attested from 1590s.

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onward (adv.)

"toward the front or a point ahead, forward; forward in time," late 14c., from on + -ward. The form onwards, with adverbial genitive -s, is attested from c. 1600. As an adjective, "moving on or forward," 1670s.

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Hayward 
proper name, from Old English hege-weard "guardian of the fence/hedge" (see hedge (n.) + ward (n.)). His original duties seem to have been protecting the fences around the Lammas lands, when enclosed, to prevent cattle from breaking in while the crops grew.
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Edward 
masc. proper name, from Old English Eadweard, literally "prosperity-guard," from ead "wealth, prosperity" (see Edith) + weard "guardian" (see ward (n.)). Among the 10 most popular names for boys born in the U.S. every year from 1895 to 1930.
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fromward (adv.)
(obsolete), late Old English framweardes, from framweard (adj.) "about to depart; doomed to die; with back turned;" opposed to toweard (see toward)); from from + -ward, and compare froward. As a preposition from c. 1200.
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homeward (adv.)
mid-13c., homward "towards home," from Old English ham weard; see home (n.) + -ward. Also Homewards, with adverbial genitive -s (Old English hamweardes). Homeward-bound is from c. 1600, originally of ships.
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afterward (adv.)
Old English æfterwearde "behind, in back, in the rear," from æft "after" (see aft) + -weard suffix indicating direction (see -ward); expanded by influence of after. Variant afterwards shows adverbial genitive. Old English also had æfterweardnes "posterity."
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leeward (adj.)
"situated away from the wind, on the side opposite the weather side of a ship, pertaining to the quarter toward which the wind blows," 1660s, from lee + -ward. Also as an adverb. Similar formation in Dutch lijwaarts, German leewärts, Swedish lävart. The Leeward Islands are so called in reference to prevailing northeasterly trade winds.
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award (v.)
late 14c., "decide after careful observation," from Anglo-French awarder, from Old North French eswarder (Old French esgarder) "decide, judge, give one's opinion" (after careful consideration), from es- "out" (see ex-) + warder "to watch," a word from Germanic (see ward (n.)). Related: Awarded; awarding.
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downward (adv.)

"from a higher to a lower place, state, or condition," late 12c., from down (adv.) + -ward. As a preposition, "down," by late 14c. As an adjective, "moving or tending from a higher to a lwer place, state, or condition," from 1550s. As an adverb Old English had aduneweard. Downwards (c. 1200), with adverbial genitive, had a parallel in Old English ofduneweardes.

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