Etymology
Advertisement
Chrysler 

U.S. automobile corporation, organized 1925 as Chrysler Corporation by Walter P. Chrysler (1875-1940) out of the old Maxwell Motor Co. (Maxwell produced a car named Chrysler in 1924). The surname is a spelling variant of German Kreisler, perhaps related to kreisel "spinning top," but the sense connection is unclear.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
nixie (n.)

"water fairy, water sprite," 1816 (introduced by Sir Walter Scott), from German Nixie, from Old High German nihhussa "water sprite," fem. of nihhus, from Proto-Germanic *nikwiz (source also of Old Norse nykr, Old English nicor "water spirit, water monster," also used to gloss hippopotamus), perhaps from PIE *neigw- "to wash" (source also of Sanskrit nenkti "washes," Greek nizo "I wash," Old Irish nigid "washes").

Related entries & more 
Sassenach (n.)

a general Gaelic word, especially among the Scottish Highlanders, for "an English person," 1771, Sassenaugh, literally "Saxon," from Gaelic Sasunnach, from Latin Saxones, from a Germanic source (such as Old English Seaxe "the Saxons;" see Saxon). The modern form of the word was established c. 1814 by Sir Walter Scott, from Scottish Sasunnoch, Irish Sasanach. The Welsh form is Seisnig.

Related entries & more 
Bauhaus (n.)
1923, from German Bauhaus, literally "architecture-house;" name of a school of design founded in Weimar, Germany, 1919 by Walter Gropius (1883-1969), later extended to the principles it embodied. First element is bau "building, construction, structure," from Old High German buan "to dwell" (from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow"). For second element, see house (n.).
Related entries & more 
hostel (n.)
early 13c., "inn, house of entertainment," from Old French ostel, hostel "house, home, dwelling; inn, lodgings, shelter" (11c., Modern French hôtel), from Medieval Latin hospitale "inn; large house" (see hospital). Obsolete after 16c., revived 1808, along with hostelry by Sir Walter Scott. Youth hostel is recorded by 1931.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Roanoke 

county in Virginia, the name (also used in other places in U.S.) is that of Sir Walter Raleigh's lost colony in what is now North Carolina; probably an Algonquian name, recorded by 1584. It might be the same word as rawranock "shells used for money, kind of wampum," which is attested in English by 1624.

Related entries & more 
unfavorable (adj.)

also unfavourable, mid-15c. (implied in unfavorably), from un- (1) "not" + favorable (adj.).

"We must not indulge in unfavorable views of mankind, since by doing it we make bad men believe that they are no worse than others, and we teach the good that they are good in vain." [Walter Savage Landor, "Imaginary Conversations"]
Related entries & more 
stereotype (n.)

1798, "method of printing from a plate," from French stéréotype (adj.) "printed by means of a solid plate of type," from Greek stereos "solid" (see stereo-) + French type "type" (see type (n.)). Meaning "a stereotype plate" is from 1817. Meaning "image perpetuated without change" is first recorded 1850, from the verb in this sense. Meaning "preconceived and oversimplified notion of characteristics typical of a person or group" is recorded from 1922 (Walter Lippmann, "Public Opinion").

Related entries & more 
a.s.a.p. 

also asap, adverbial phrase pronounced either as a word (acronym) or as four letters (initialism), 1920, in a list of abbreviations recommended for secretaries in dental offices, from initial letters of phrase as soon as possible. The article (Walter E. Fancher, D.D.S., "The Practical Application of the Dental Hygienist in General Practice," in Oral Hygiene, March 1920) also has A.S.A.C. for as soon as convenient.

Related entries & more 
resentment (n.)

"deep sense of injury, the excitement of passion which proceeds from a sense of wrong offered to one's self or one's kindred or friends," especially when directed at the author of the affront, 1610s, from French ressentiment (16c.), verbal noun from ressentir (see resent). Slightly earlier in English in the French form resentiment (1590s); also compare ressentiment.

"Ridicule often parries resentment, but resentment never yet parried ridicule." [Walter Savage Landor, "Imaginary Conversations"]
Related entries & more 

Page 3