Etymology
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kersey (n.)
type of coarse woolen cloth, common 14c.-16c., late 14c., said to be from the name of the village in Suffolk, which supposedly is connected with the original manufacture of the cloth.
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thorp (n.)
Old English ðorp "village, hamlet, farm, estate," reinforced by Old Norse ðorp, both from Proto-Germanic *thurpa- (source also of Old Frisian thorp, Frisian terp, Middle Dutch, Dutch dorp, German dorf "village," Gothic þaurp "estate, land, field"), probably from PIE root *treb- "dwelling" (see tavern). Preserved in place names ending in -thorp, -thrup.
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Hussite (n.)
1530s, follower of John Huss, Bohemian religious reformer burnt in 1415. His name is said to be an abbreviation of the name of his native village, Husinec, literally "goose-pen."
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Caracas 
Venezuelan capital, founded 1567 by the Spaniards on the site of a razed village of the Caracas people, whose name is of unknown origin, and named for them.
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Piltdown 

village in Sussex, England, site where a fossil humanoid skull was said to have been found (1912); it was proved a fraud in 1953.

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Roquefort 
type of cheese, 1837, from the village in the southwest of France, where it originally was made. Reference to salad dressing made from this kind of cheese is from 1943.
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Carthusian (adj.)
late 14c., from Latin Cartusianus, in reference to an austere order of monks founded 1086 by St. Bruno at Chartreux, village in Dauphiné, France.
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Hoboken 
city in New Jersey, U.S., birthplace of Frank Sinatra, named by 17c. Dutch settlers for a village in modern Belgium that is now a suburb of Antwerp.
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*tkei- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to settle, dwell, be home."

It forms all or part of: Amphictyonic; hamlet; hangar; haunt; home; site; situate; situation; situs.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit kseti "abides, dwells;" Armenian shen "inhabited;" Greek kome, Lithuanian kaimas "village;" Old Church Slavonic semija "domestic servants;" Old English ham "dwelling place, house, abode," German heim "home," Gothic haims "village."
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Ascot 
village near Windsor, Berkshire, literally "eastern cottage." The site of fashionable horse race meetings, hence its use attributively for clothes suitable for the event; especially a type of tie (1889).
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