Etymology
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external (adj.)

early 15c., "overt;" by 1590s as "situated or lying outside," from Latin externus "outside, outward" (from exterus; see exterior) + -al (1). This version won out over exterial. Related: Externally.

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Matthew 
masc. proper name, introduced in England by the Normans, from Old French Mathieu, from Late Latin Matthaeus, from Greek Matthaios, contraction of Mattathias, from Hebrew Mattathyah "gift of Jehovah," from mattath "gift." Variant Matthias is from the Greek version.
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ogre (n.)

"man-eating giant of fairy tales and popular legends," 1713, hogre (in a translation of a French version of the Arabian Nights), from French ogre, first used in Perrault's "Contes," 1697, and perhaps formed by him from a dialectal variant of Italian orco "demon, monster," from Latin Orcus "Hades," which is of unknown origin. In English, more literary than colloquial. The conjecture that it is from Byzantine Ogur "Hungarian" or some other version of that people's name (perhaps via confusion with the bloodthirsty Huns), lacks historical evidence. Related: Ogrish; ogreish; ogrishness; ogreishness.

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supercalifragilisticexpialidocious 
from song in 1964 Disney movie version of "Mary Poppins;" subject of a lawsuit based on earlier song title "Supercalafajalistickexpialadojus" (1949), but other versions of the word also were in circulation.
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shuffleboard (n.)
1530s, shovillaborde "shovel board," an unexplained alteration of shove-board (1520s), from shove (v.) + board (n.1). Originally a tabletop game (c. 1600), the large-scale version (1877) was invented for play on ocean liners.
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Brontë 

surname of the famous family of English authors; the current version is a scholarly convention and until after the deaths of the sisters it was variously spelled and accented. Juliet Barker ("The Brontës," 1994), writes that their father was registered at Cambridge in 1802 as "Patrick Branty," which he soon corrected to Bronte. The family was Irish Protestant. "At a time when literacy was extremely rare, especially in rural districts of Ireland, the usual Brontë name was spelt in a variety of ways, ranging from Prunty to Brunty and Bruntee, with no consistent version until Patrick himself decided on 'Bronte'." [Barker]

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chad (n.1)

also Mr. Chad, simple graffiti drawing of a head peering over a fence or wall, with the caption, "Wot, no ______?" (the U.S. version usually had "Kilroy was here"), 1945, British, of unknown origin, a reaction to war-time shortages and rationing.

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preggers (adj.)

"pregnant," 1942, British slang, from pregnant (adj.1) + ending as in bonkers, crackers, starkers. This seems to be an expanded version of -er (3), the suffix used to make jocular or familiar formations from common or proper names (as in rugger for rugby, and soccer).

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duplication (n.)

early 15c., "act of doubling," from Old French duplicacion (13c.) and directly from Latin duplicationem (nominative duplicatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of duplicare "to double" (see duplicate (adj.)). Sense of "act of making or repeating something essentially the same" is from 1580s. Meaning "a duplicate copy or version" is by 1872.

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frore (adj.)
"frosty, frozen," archaic (but found in poetry as late as Keats), c. 1200, from Old English froren, past participle of freosan (see freeze (v.)). Related: Froren, which would be the title of the Anglo-Saxon version of Disney's movie.
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