Etymology
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practise 

the usual spelling outside American English of practice as a verb. It also is the form of the verb in the U.S.-produced "Century Dictionary" (1889). Related: Practised; practising.

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non-verbal (adj.)

also nonverbal, "not using words," by 1809, from non- + verbal. Related: Non-verbally.

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verboten (adj.)
1912, German, "forbidden," from Old High German farbiotan "to forbid," cognate with forbid (q.v.).
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verbalize (v.)
c. 1600, "use too many words," from French verbaliser (16c.); see verbal. Meaning "express in words" is attested from 1875. Related: Verbalized; verbalizing.
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verbosity (n.)
1540s, from French verbosité (16c.) or directly from Late Latin verbositas, from Latin verbosus (see verbose).
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verbena (n.)
genus of plants, the vervain, 1560s, from Latin verbena "leaves or twigs of olive, myrtle, laurel, or other sacred plants employed in religious ceremonies," from PIE *werbh- "to turn, bend" (source also of Lithuanian virbas "twig, branch, scion, rod"), from root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend."
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hamstring (v.)

1640s, "to disable, render useless," a figurative verbal extension from hamstring (n.) "tendon at the back of the knee." Cutting this would render a person or animal lame. Literal sense of the verb is attested from 1670s. Since it is a verb from a noun-noun compound, hamstrung as a past participle is technically incorrect.

[I]n hamstring, -string is not the verb string; we do not string the ham, but do something to the tendon called the hamstring; the verb, that is, is made not from the two words ham & string, but from the noun hamstring. It must therefore make hamstringed. [Fowler]
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ding-dong 

imitative of the sound of a bell, 1550s. As a verb from 1650s.

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