Etymology
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transfusion (n.)

1570s, "action of pouring liquid from one vessel to another," from French transfusion and directly from Latin transfusionem (nominative transfusio) "a decanting, intermingling," noun of action from past-participle stem of transfundere "pour from one container to another," from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + fundere "to pour" (from nasalized form of PIE root *gheu- "to pour"). Sense of "transfering of blood from one individual to another" first recorded 1640s.

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pulsate (v.)

"to beat or throb (as the heart or a blood vessel); contract and dilate in alternation or rhythmically," 1741, a back-formation from pulsation, or else from Latin pulsatus, past participle of pulsare "to beat against, strike upon," frequentative of pellere (past participle pulsus) "to beat, strike" (from PIE root *pel- (5) "to thrust, strike, drive"). Related: Pulsated; pulsating; pulsatile.

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vein (n.)
c. 1300, from Old French veine "vein, artery, pulse" (12c.), from Latin vena "a blood vessel," also "a water course, a vein of metal, a person's natural ability or interest," of unknown origin. The mining sense is attested in English from late 14c. (Greek phleps "vein" had the same secondary sense). Figurative sense of "strain or intermixture" (of some quality) is recorded from 1560s; that of "a humor or mood, natural tendency" is first recorded 1570s.
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azotemia (n.)
"presence of excess nitrogen in the blood," 1894, also azotaemia, from azote "nitrogen" (see azo-) + -emia "blood." Related: Azotemic.
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sanguinivorous (adj.)
"blood-drinking," 1821, from Latin sanguis "blood" (see sanguinary) + -vorous "eating, devouring."
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bloodthirsty (adj.)
also blood-thirsty, "eager to shed blood," 1530s (Coverdale, Psalms xxv.9), from blood (n.) + thirsty (adj.). Ancient Greek had a similar image in haimodipsos. Related: Bloodthirstiness.
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pureblood (adj.)

also pure-blood, "of unmixed inheritance or ancestry," 1851, from pure blood (n.), attested from 1751 in reference to breeding, from pure (adj.), which is attested from late 15c. in reference to unmixed descent or lineage, + blood (n.). As a noun meaning "a pure-blood animal" from 1882.

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embolus (n.)
1660s, "stopper, wedge," from Latin embolus "piston of a pump," from Greek embolos "peg, stopper; anything pointed so as to be easily thrust in," also "a tongue (of land), beak (of a ship)," from emballein "to insert, throw in, invade" from assimilated form of en "in" (see en- (2)) + ballein "to throw" (from PIE root *gwele- "to throw, reach"). Medical sense in reference to obstruction of a blood vessel is from 1866. Related: Embolic.
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sanguinous (adj.)

early 15c., "bloodshot," from Late Latin sanguinosus "full of blood," from Latin sanguis "blood" (see sanguinary). Meaning "pertaining to blood" is from 1813.

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anaemia (n.)
"deficiency of blood in a living body," 1824, a medical term from French (1761), from Latinized form of Greek anaimia "lack of blood," from anaimos "bloodless," from an- "without" (see an- (1)) + haima "blood" (see -emia).
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