Etymology
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purine (n.)

basic crystalline substance found in uric acid, caffeine, adenine, etc., 1898, from German purin (Fischer), said to be from Latin purum, neuter of purus "clean, pure" (see pure) + Modern Latin uricum "uric acid" (see urine) + chemical suffix -ine (2). Related: Purinergic.

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pee (v.)

1788, "to spray with urine" (trans.), euphemistic abbreviation of piss. Meaning "to urinate" is from 1879. Related: Peed; peeing. Noun meaning "act of urination" is attested by 1902; as "urine" by 1961. Reduplicated form pee-pee is attested by 1923.

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chamber-lye (n.)
"urine used as a detergent," 1570s, from chamber (n.) in the "privy" sense + lye.
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piss (n.)

"urine," late 14c., from piss (v.). As a pure intensifier (piss-poor, piss-ugly, etc.) it dates from 1940, popularized in World War II. Piss and vinegar "vim, energy" is attested from 1942. Piss-prophet "one who diagnoses diseases by inspection of urine" is attested from 1620s. Piss proud "erect upon awakening" is attested from 1796.

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lant (n.)
"stale urine used for industrial purposes, chamber-lye," Old English hland.
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piss-pot (n.)

"chamber-pot, earthenware vessel for urine," mid-15c., pisse-pot, from piss + pot (n.1).

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chamber-pot (n.)

also chamberpot, "vessel for urine used in bedrooms," 1560s, from chamber (n.) in the "privy" sense + pot (n.1).

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addle (v.)

"become putrid," hence "be spoiled, be made worthless or ineffective," 1640s (implied in addled), from archaic addle (n.) "urine, liquid filth," from Old English adela "mud, mire, liquid manure" (cognate with East Frisian adel "dung," Old Swedish adel "urine," Middle Low German adel "mud," Dutch aal "puddle").

Popularly used in the noun phrase addle egg (mid-13c.) "egg that does not hatch, rotten egg," a loan-translation of Latin ovum urinum, literally "urine egg," which is itself an erroneous loan-translation of Greek ourion ōon "putrid egg," literally "wind egg," from ourios "of the wind" (confused by Roman writers with ourios "of urine," from ouron "urine").

From this phrase, since c. 1600 the noun in English was mistaken as an adjective meaning "putrid," and thence given a figurative extension to "empty, vain, idle," also "confused, muddled, unsound" (1706), then back-formed into a verb in that sense. Related: Addling.

Popular in forming derogatory compounds 17c. and after, such as addle-headed "stupid, muddled" (1660s); addle-pated (1630s); addle-pate "stupid bungler" (c. 1600); addle-plot "spoil-sport, person who spoils any amusement" (1690s).

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diabetes (n.)

medical name of a set of affections characterized by abnormal discharge of urine, 1560s, from medical Latin diabetes, from late Greek diabetes "excessive discharge of urine" (so named by Aretaeus the Cappadocian, physician of Alexandria, 2c.), literally "a passer-through, siphon," from diabainein "to pass through," from dia "through" (see dia-) + bainein "to go, walk, step" (from PIE root *gwa- "to go, come").

Now usually restricted to diabetes mellitus, which is characterized by an excessive quantity of sugar in the urine. An old common native name for it was pissing evil. In classical Greek, diabainein meant "to stand or walk with the legs apart," and diabetes meant "a drafting compass," from the position of the legs.

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pismire (n.)

"ant," late 14c., pisse-mire (early 14c. as a surname, Henricus pessemere), from pyss "urine" (said to be in reference to the acrid smell of an anthill) + mire "an ant" (mid-13c., early 13c. as a surname), perhaps from an unattested Old English word or from Old Norse maurr "ant" (cognate with Swedish myra, Danish myre, Middle Dutch miere, Dutch mier, Crimean Gothic miera "ant"), from PIE *morwi- (see Formica (2)). Compare pissant, also Old Frisian pis-imme, Norwegian migemaur (first element from Latin mingere); early Dutch mierseycke (with seycke "urine"), Finnish kusiainen (with kusi "urine").

He is as angry as a pissemyre,
Though þat he haue al that he kan desire.
[Chaucer]

Applied contemptuously to persons from 1560s.

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