Etymology
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orthodontics (n.)

"orthodontia, the branch of dentistry concerned with the treatment of irregularities of the teeth and jaws," 1909, from orthodontic (adj.); also see -ics.

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pre-treat (v.)

also pretreat, "to treat beforehand," by 1912, originally in reference to water purification, from pre- "before" + treat (v.). Related: Pre-treated; pre-treating; pre-treatment.

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hyperinflation (n.)
1925 in the economic sense, from hyper- "over, exceedingly, to excess" + inflation. Earlier as a medical term in treatment of lung diseases.
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entreaty (n.)
mid-15c., "treatment; negotiation;" see entreat + -y (1). Meaning "urgent solicitation, earnest request" is from 1570s. Related: Entreaties.
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precool (v.)

also pre-cool, "cool prior to use or before some further treatment," 1904, from pre- + cool (v.). Related: Precooled; precooling.

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treatable (adj.)
c. 1300, "amenable to reason," from Anglo-French tretable, Old French traitable, and in part from treat (v.) + -able. Of wounds, diseases, etc., "receptive to treatment," early 15c.
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rinse (n.)

"a light washing; a renewed application of water to remove residue from a former washing," 1837, from rinse (v.). As a hair treatment, by 1928. An earlier noun was Middle English rincinge (c. 1300).

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tract (n.2)
"little book, treatise" mid-12c., probably a shortened form of Latin tractatus "a handling, treatise, treatment," from tractare "to handle" (see treat (v.)). Related: Tractarian.
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obstetrics (n.)

"science of midwifery, the department of medicine which deals with the treatment and care of women during pregnancy and childbirth," 1819, from obstetric (adj.); also see -ics.

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sericulture (n.)

"the breeding, rearing and treatment of silkworms," 1839, from French sériciculture (19c.), from Latin sericum (nominative serica) "silk" (see serge). For second element, see culture (n.). Also used in the classically correct form sericiculture. Related: Sericultural; sericulturalist.

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