Etymology
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lieutenancy (n.)

"office or authority of a lieutenant," mid-15c., from lieutenant + abstract noun suffix -cy.

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disempower (v.)

"divest or deprive of power or authority," 1745; see dis- + empower. Related: Disempowered; disempowerment.

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Homer 

traditional name of the supposed author of the "Iliad" and the "Odyssey," from Latin Homerus, from Greek Homeros. It is identical to Greek homeros "a hostage," said to also mean in dialects "blind" (the connecting notion is "going with a companion"). But the name also has been otherwise explained.

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architecture (n.)

1560s, "the art of building," especially of fine or beautiful building; "tasteful application of scientific and traditional rules of good construction to the materials at hand," from French architecture, from Latin architectura, from architectus "master builder, chief workman" (see architect). The meaning "buildings constructed architecturally" is from 1610s.

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permit (n.)

"written statement of permission or licence, written authority to do something," 1714, from permit (v.).

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katakana (n.)

one of the two traditional styles of writing Japanese (along with hiragana), 1727, from Japanese katakana, from kata "side" + kana "borrowed letter(s)," short for kari-na- "borrowed names." Used now largely for writing proper names and foreign words.

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decree (v.)

"to order or promulgate with authority," late 14c., decreen, from decree (n.). Related: Decreed; decreeing.

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dictatorship (n.)

1580s, "office or term of a (Roman) dictator," from dictator + -ship. The sense of "absolute authority" evolved by late 17c.

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dominance (n.)

"rule, control; authority; ascendancy," 1819; see dominant + -ance. Perhaps from French dominance (by 1743). Related: Dominancy.

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appeal (n.)

c. 1300, "proceeding taken to reverse a decision by submitting it to the review of a higher authority," from Old French apel "call, appeal in court" (Modern French appel), back-formation from apeler "call upon" (see appeal (v.)). The meaning "a call to an authority" is from 1620s; that of "attractive power" attested by 1904.

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