Etymology
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Atlantis 

mythical island-nation, by 1730, from Greek Atlantis, literally "daughter of Atlas," noun use of fem. adjective from Atlas (stem Atlant-; see Atlas). All references trace to Plato's dialogues "Timaeus" and "Critias," both written c. 360 B.C.E.

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beef (v.)

"to complain," slang, 1888, American English, from noun meaning "complaint" (1880s). The noun meaning "argument" is recorded from 1930s. The origin and signification of these are unclear; perhaps they trace to the common late 19c. complaint of soldiers about the quantity or quality of beef rations.

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swathe (v.)

"to bind with bandages, swaddle, wrap," Old English swaþian "to swathe, wrap up," from swaðu "track, trace" (see swath). The noun meaning "infant's swaddling bands" was found in Old English as swaþum (dative plural). Related: Swathed; swathing.

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life of Riley (n.)

"life at ease," by 1902 (as Reilly), popularized in U.S. during World War I; it seems to have been military slang initially, sometimes said to trace to various songs but none of that title has been found.

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scar (n.1)

[mark on skin resulting from a wound or hurt] late 14c., scarre, "trace left on skin by a healed wound, burn, etc.," from Old French escare "scab" (Modern French escarre), from Late Latin eschara, from Greek eskhara, in medical writing "scab formed after a burn," which is of uncertain origin.

The English sense probably shows influence of another noun scar "crack, cut, incision" (Middle English scarre, skar; attested from late 14c. into 17c.), which is from Old Norse skarð and related to score (n.). Figurative sense attested from 1580s. Old English glossed Latin cicatrix with dolhswað, from dolh "wound" + swað "track, trace."

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pavan (n.)

"slow, stately dance," 1530s, from French pavane (1520s), probably from Spanish pavana, from pavo "peacock" (from Latin pavo; see peacock), in reference to the bird's courting movements. But some see an Italian origin and trace the name to Padovana "Paduan." Possibly it is a merger of two distinct dance words.

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Grinch (n.)

"spoilsport;" all usages trace to Dr. Seuss's 1957 book "How the Grinch Stole Christmas." Kipling used grinching (1892) in reference to a harsh, grating noise; and Grinch had been used as the surname of severe characters in fiction at least since 1903.

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fly (adj.)

slang, "clever, alert, wide awake," by 1811, perhaps from fly (n.) on the notion of the insect being hard to catch. Other theories, however, trace it to fledge or flash. Slang use in 1990s might be a revival or a reinvention.

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lineation (n.)

late 14c., "the act of drawing lines," from Latin lineationem (nominative lineatio) "a drawing of a line, the making in a straight line," noun of action from past-participle stem of lineare in an unrecorded sense "trace lines" (see lineament). Meaning "a marking by lines" is from 1540s.

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instep (n.)

"arch of the foot," mid-15c., apparently from in + step, "though this hardly makes sense" [Weekley]. An Old English word for "instep" was fotwelm. Middle English had also a verb instep "to track, trace" (c. 1400). Old English instæpe (n.) meant "an entrance."

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