Etymology
Advertisement
all-time (adj.)
"during recorded time," 1910, American English, from all + time (n.). Earlier it had been used in a sense "full-time," of employment, or in opposition to one-time (1883). Middle English had al-time (adv.) "at all times, always; all the time" (c. 1400).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
old-time (adj.)

"of long standing; having the characteristics of former times," 1824, from old + time (n.). Related: Old-timey (1850). Old times "olden days" is from late 14c. Colloquial old-timer "one who has long occupied a given place or condition; one who retains the views and customs of former times" is by 1860.

Related entries & more 
time zone (n.)

by 1885, from time (n.) + zone (n.). As in Britain and France, the movement to regulate time nationally came from the railroads.

Previous to 1883 the methods of measuring time in the United States were so varied and so numerous as to be ludicrous. There were 50 different standards used in the United States, and on one road between New York and Boston, whose actual difference is 12 minutes, there were three distinct standards of time. Even small towns had two different standards one known as "town" or local time and the other "railroad" time.
... At noon on November 18, 1883, there was a general resetting of watches and clocks all over the United States and Canada, and the four great time zones, one hour apart, into which the country was divided came into being. So smoothly did the plan work that the general readjustment was accomplished without great difficulty and it has worked satisfactorily ever since. [Railroad Trainman, September 1909]
Related entries & more 
small-time (adj.)
1910, originally theater slang for lower-salaried circuits, or ones requiring more daily performances; from noun phrase (also 1910). Compare big time.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
timewise (adv.)
also time-wise, 1898, from time (n.) + wise (n.).
Related entries & more 
timer (n.)
1908 as a mechanical device, agent noun from time (v.).
Related entries & more 
big time (n.)
"upper reaches of a profession or pursuit," by 1909 in vaudeville slang. As an adjective by 1915. The same phrase was common in colloquial use late 19c.-early 20c. in a broad range of senses: "party, shindig, fun, frolic."
Related entries & more 
timetable (n.)
1838, originally of railway trains, from time (n.) + table (n.).
Related entries & more 

Page 3