Etymology
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ridgepole (n.)

also ridge-pole, 1670s, "timber at the ridge of a roof, into which the rafters are fastened," from ridge (n.) + pole (n.1). By 1788 as  "horizontal pole of a tent." Ridge-pole pine is by 1885.

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seasoned (adj.)

mid-15c., "flavored, spiced," past-participle adjective from season (v.). Meaning "fit for use, matured, hardened" (of timber, etc.), is from 1540s; that of "acclimatized, accustomed" (of persons, animals, etc.) is from 1640s.

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bobsled (n.)
also bob-sled, 1839, originally used for hauling timber, from bob (n.2) + sled (n.). So called because it is a short type, or because its body rested on short bobs, one behind the other.
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architrave (n.)
1560s as a feature of architectural columns; 1660s of window parts, from Italian architrave, from Latin archi- "beginning, origin" (see archon) + Italian trave "beam," from Latin trabem (nominative trabs) "beam, timber," from PIE root *treb- "dwelling" (see tavern).
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rib-band (n.)

also ribband, in ship-building, "long, flexible timber extending the length of the vessel body and nailed or bolted around the ribs to hold them in position," 1711, from rib (n.) + band (n.1).

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hylo- 

word-forming element meaning "wood, forest," also "matter," from Greek hylos "a wood, a forest, woodland; wood, firewood, timber; stuff, material," used by Aristotle for "matter" in the philosophical sense; a word of unknown origin.

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rafter (n.1)

"sloping timber of a roof," c. 1200, from Old English ræftras (West Saxon), reftras (Mercian), both plural, "a beam, pole, rafter of a building," related to Old Norse raptr "log," from Proto-Germanic *raf-tra-, from PIE *rap-tro-, from root *rep- "stake, beam."

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rip-saw (n.)

"a hand-saw the teeth of which have more rake and less set than a cross-cut saw, used for cutting wood in the direction of the grain" [Century Dictionary], 1846, from rip (n.) "split timber" (see rip (v.) + saw (n.1)).

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pit-saw (n.)

"large saw used for cutting timber, operated by two men, one (the pit-sawyer) standing in the pit below the log that is being sawed, the other (the top-sawyer) standing on the log," 1670s, from pit (n.) + saw (n.1).

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trounce (v.)

1550s, "to trouble, afflict, harass," later "to beat, thrash" (1560s), of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to French troncer "to cut, cut off a piece from," from tronce "piece of timber," from Old French tronc (see trunk (n.1)). Related: Trounced; trouncing.

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