Etymology
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monitory (adj.)

"giving admonition, conveying a warning," late 15c., from Latin monitorius "admonishing," from monitus, past participle of monere "to admonish, warn, advise," from PIE *moneie- "to make think of, remind," suffixed (causative) form of root *men- (1) "to think."

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value (v.)
Origin and meaning of value
mid-15c., "estimate the value of," also "think highly of," probably from value (n.). Related: Valued, valuing.
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ideate (v.)
c. 1600, "imagine, form ideas," from idea + -ate (2). From 1862 as "to think." Related: Ideated; ideating.
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meditate (v.)

1580s, "to ponder, think abstractly, engage in mental contemplation" (intransitive), probably a back-formation from meditation, or else from Latin meditatus, past participle of meditari "to meditate, think over, reflect, consider," frequentative form of PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures." From 1590s as "to plan in the mind," also "to employ the mind in thought or contemplation," especially in a religious way. Related: Meditated; meditating.

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premonition (n.)

mid-15c., premunicion, premunition, "preliminary warning, previous notification or admonishment," from Anglo-French premunition (late 14c.), Old French premonicion, from Medieval Latin praemonitionem (nominative praemonitio) "a forewarning," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin praemonere "forewarn," from prae "before" (see pre-) + monere "to admonish, warn, advise," from PIE *moneie- "to make think of, remind," suffixed (causative) form of root *men- (1) "to think."

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monition (n.)

c. 1400, monicioun, "warning, instruction given by way of caution," from Old French monition (13c.) and directly from Latin monitionem (nominative monitio) "warning, admonition, reminding," noun of action from past-participle stem of monere "to admonish, warn, advise," from PIE *moneie- "to make think of, remind," suffixed (causative) form of root *men- (1) "to think." With specific meanings in civil and ecclesiastical law.

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suspicion (n.)
c. 1300, "act of suspecting; unverified conjecture of wrongdoing; mistrust, distrust," from Anglo-French suspecioun, corresponding to Old French suspicion, sospeçon "mistrust, suspicion" (Modern French soupçon), from Late Latin suspectionem (nominative suspectio) "mistrust, suspicion, fear, awe," noun of state from past participle stem of Latin suspicere "look up at" (see suspect (adj.)). Spelling in English influenced 14c. by learned Old French forms closer to Latin suspicionem. Used as a verb meaning "to suspect," it figures in literary representations of U.S. Western (Kentucky) slang from 1830s.

"Suspicion" words in other Indo-European languages also tend to be words for "think" or "look" with prefixes meaning "under, behind;" such as Greek hypopsia (hypo "under," opsis "sight"), hyponoia (noein "to think"); Lettish aizduomas (aiz "behind," duomat "think"); Russian podozrenie (Slavic podu "under," Old Church Slavonic zireti "see, look"); Dutch achterdocht (achter "behind," denken "to think").
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ament (n.)
"person born an idiot," 1894, from Latin amentia "madness," from amentem "mad," from a for ab "away from" (see a- (2)) + mentem "mind," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think."
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memento (n.)

late 14c., "Psalm cxxxi in the Canon of the Mass" (which begins with the Latin word Memento and in which the dead are commemorated), from Latin memento "remember," second person singular imperative of meminisse "to remember, recollect, think of, bear in mind," a reduplicated form, related to mens "mind," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think." Meaning "a hint or suggestion to awaken memory, a reminder, an object serving as a warning" is from 1580s; sense of "keepsake" is recorded by 1768.

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reason (v.)

c. 1400, resounen, "to question (someone)," also "to challenge," from Old French resoner, raisoner "speak, discuss; argue; address; speak to," from Late Latin rationare "to discourse," from Latin ratio "reckoning, understanding, motive, cause," from ratus, past participle of reri "to reckon, think" (from PIE root *re- "to reason, count").

The intransitive sense of "to think in a logical manner, exercise the faculty of reason" is from 1590s; transitive sense of "employ reasoning (with someone)" is from 1680s. Related: Reasoned; reasoning.

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