Etymology
Advertisement
ism (n.)
"distinctive doctrine, theory, or practice," 1670s, the suffix -ism used as an independent word, chiefly disparagingly. Related: Ismatical. By the same path, ist is from 1811.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
dippy (adj.)

"mad, insane, crazy," especially in love, 1903, perhaps from dip + -y (2), but the exact signification is unclear. Another theory connects it with dipsomania.

Related entries & more 
developmental (adj.)

"pertaining to development; formed or characterized by development," 1830, from development + -al (1). Developmentalist (1862) was a word for "follower of the theory of evolution."

Related entries & more 
reflexology (n.)

1927, as a psychological theory, from German reflexologie (1912); see reflex + -ology. As a foot massage technique for releasing nervous tension, recorded by 1976.

Related entries & more 
activism (n.)
1920 in the political sense of "advocating energetic action;" see active + -ism. Earlier (1907) it was used in reference to a philosophical theory. Compare activist.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
oratory (n.1)

"formal public speaking; the art of eloquence," 1580s, from Latin (ars) oratoria "oratorical (art)," fem. of oratorius "of speaking or pleading, pertaining to an orator," from ōrare "to speak, pray, plead" (see orator).

Oratory is the art or the act of speaking, or the speech. Rhetoric is the theory of the art of composing discourse in either the spoken or the written form. Elocution is the manner of speaking or the theory of the art of speaking ...: the word is equally applicable to the presentation of one's own or of another's thoughts. [Century Dictionary]
Related entries & more 
intelligent (adj.)
c. 1500, a back-formation from intelligence or else from Latin intelligentem (nominative intelligens), present participle of intelligere. Intelligent design, as a name for an alternative to atheistic cosmology and the theory of evolution, is from 1999. Related: Intelligently.
Related entries & more 
Mendelism (n.)

theory of inheritance of characteristic by means of (what now are called) genes, 1903, in reference to the work of Gregor Johann Mendel (1822-1884), Austrian biologist who enunciated the laws of heredity. Related: Mendelian.

Related entries & more 
communalism (n.)

"theory or principles of government by independent communes," 1871 (in reference to Paris), from French communalisme; see communal + -ism. Perhaps coined to keep the idea distinct from communisme.

Related entries & more 
rebarbative (adj.)

"repellent, unattractive," 1885, from French rébarbatif (14c.), from barbe "beard," from Latin barba (see barb (n.)). The usual theory is that it refers to the itchy, irritating quality of a beard.

Related entries & more 

Page 3