Etymology
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material (n.)

late 14c., "component substance, matter from which a thing is made," from material (adj.).

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saprophagous (adj.)

"feeding on putrid matter," 1819, Modern Latin; see sapro- + -phagous.

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sun-dried (adj.)
1630s in reference to vegetable matter, from sun (n.) + past-participle adjective from dry (v.).
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in re (prep.)

"in the matter of, in the (legal) case of," c. 1600, probably from Duns Scotus; Latin, from re, ablative of res "property, goods; matter, thing, affair," from Proto-Italic *re-, from PIE *reh-i- "wealth, goods" (source also of Sanskrit rayi- "property, goods," Avestan raii-i- "wealth").

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koan (n.)
Zen paradox meant to stimulate the mind, 1918, from Japanese ko "public" + an "matter for thought."
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concretion (n.)

c. 1600, "act of growing together or uniting in one mass;" 1640s, "mass of solid matter formed by growing together or conglomeration," from French concrétion (16c.) or directly from Latin concretionem (nominative concretio) "a compacting, uniting, condensing; materiality, matter," from concretus "condensed, congealed" (see concrete (adj.) ). Related: Concretional; concretionary.

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Madeira 

group of volcanic islands off the northwest coast of Africa, from Portuguese madeira "wood," because the main island formerly was thickly wooded, from Latin materia "wood, matter" (see matter (n.)). As a type of fine wine of the sherry class, 1540s, from the island, where it was produced.

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commercialization (n.)

"operation of making (something) a matter of profit above other considerations," 1885, from commercialize + noun ending -ation.

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elimination (n.)
c. 1600, "a casting out," noun of action from eliminate. Meaning "expulsion of waste matter" is from 1855.
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plasticity (n.)

"capability of being molded or formed; property of giving form or shape to matter," 1768, from plastic (adj.) + -ity.

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