Etymology
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rend (v.)

Middle English renden "tear a hole in, slash from top to bottom, separate in parts with force or sudden violence," from Old English rendan, hrendan "to tear, cut down," from Proto-West Germanic *rendan (source also of Old Frisian renda "to cut, break," Middle Low German rende "anything broken," German Rinde "bark, crust"), which is probably related to the noun source of rind. In Middle English also torenden. Related: Rended; rent; rending.

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demolish (v.)

1560s, "to destroy the structural character of (a building, wall, etc.), by violently pulling it to pieces," from French demoliss-, present-participle stem of démolir "to destroy, tear down" (late 14c.), from Latin demoliri "tear down," from de "down" (see de-) + moliri "build, construct," from moles (genitive molis) "massive structure" (see mole (n.3)). Figurative sense of "to destroy, lay waste" is from 1610s; humorously, "to consume," by 1756. Related: Demolished; demolishing.

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rabble (n.2)

"iron bar, bent at right angles at one end, for stirring molten metal," 1864, from French râble, from Old French roable, from Latin rutabulum "rake, fire shovel" (in Medieval Latin also rotabulum), from ruere "to churn or plow up, dig out," (from PIE *reuo-, source also of  Sanskrit ravisam, ravat "to wound, hurt;" Lithuanian ráuti "to tear out, pull," ravėti "to weed;" Russian ryt'i, roju "to dig," Old Church Slavonic rylo "spade," Old Norse ryja "to tear out wool," German roden "to root out").

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rent (n.2)

"torn place, opening made by rending or tearing," 1530s, noun use of Middle English renten "to tear, rend" (early 14c.), a variant of renden (see rend (v.)). Of clefts or fissures in the earth by 1702.

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spado (n.)

"castrated person," early 15c., from Latin spado, from Greek spadōn "eunuch," which, according to Beekes, is related to spadix "(torn off) twig" and derived from span "pull out, pluck; tear away" (see spasm).

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wear (n.)

"action of wearing" (clothes), mid-15c., from wear (v.). Meaning "what one wears" is 1560s. To be the worse for wear is attested from 1782; noun phrase wear and tear is first recorded 1660s, implying the sense "process of being degraded by use."

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vulture (n.)

late 14c., from Anglo-French vultur, Old French voutoir, voutre (Modern French vautour), from Latin vultur, earlier voltur, perhaps related to vellere "to pluck, to tear" (see svelte). Figurative sense is recorded from 1580s. Related: Vulturine; vulturous.

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vulnerable (adj.)

c. 1600, from Late Latin vulnerabilis "wounding," from Latin vulnerare "to wound, hurt, injure, maim," from vulnus (genitive vulneris) "wound," perhaps related to vellere "pluck, to tear" (see svelte), or from PIE *wele-nes-, from *wele- (2) "to strike, wound" (see Valhalla).

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Scylla (n.)

female sea-monster in the Strait of Messina, presiding genius of a dangerous rock in the passage, from Latinized form of Greek Skylla, Skyllē, a name of unknown origin, traditionally associated with skylax "a young dog, dog," from skyllein "to tear." Compare Charybdis.

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harrow (v.1)

"to drag a harrow over, break or tear with a harrow," c. 1300, from harrow (n.). In the figurative sense of "wound the feelings, distress greatly" it is first attested c. 1600 in Shakespeare. Related: Harrowed; harrowing.

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