Etymology
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tantric (adj.)
1905, from tantra + -ic; used loosely in the West to denote erotic spiritualism.
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Tanzania 
east African nation, formed 1964 by union of Tanganyika (named for the lake, the name of which is of unknown origin) and Zanzibar. With country-name word-forming element -ia. Related: Tanzanian.
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oil-tank (n.)

"tank for holding oil," 1862, from oil (n.) + tank (n.).

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tangential (adj.)
1620s, see tangent (adj.) + -ial. Figurative sense of "divergent, erratic" is from 1787; that of "slightly connected" is from 1825. Related: Tangentially.
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tanker (n.)
"ship for carrying oil or other liquid cargo," 1900, from tank (n.).
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tangy (adj.)
1875, from tang + -y (2). Figurative use by 1948. Related: Tanginess.
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Tangier 
port city of Morocco, Latin Tinge, said to be named for Tingis, daughter of Atlas, but probably from Semitic tigisis "harbor." In English often Tangiers, by influence of Algiers.
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tantalise (v.)
chiefly British English spelling of tantalize. For suffix, see -ize. Related: Tantalised; tantalising.
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tandem (n.)
1785, "carriage pulled by horses harnessed one behind the other" (instead of side-by-side), jocular use of Latin tandem "at length (of time), at last, so much," from tam "so" (from PIE *tam-, adverbial form of demonstrative pronoun root *-to-; see -th (1)) + demonstrative suffix -dem. "Probably first in university use" [Century Dictionary]. Transferred by 1884 to bicycles with two seats. In English as an adverb from 1795; as an adjective from 1801.
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tangle (v.)
mid-14c., nasalized variant of tagilen "to involve in a difficult situation, entangle," from a Scandinavian source (compare dialectal Swedish taggla "to disorder," Old Norse þongull "seaweed"), from Proto-Germanic *thangul- (source also of Frisian tung, Dutch tang, German Tang "seaweed"); thus the original sense of the root evidently was "seaweed" as something that entangles (itself, or oars, or fishes, or nets). "The development of such a verb from a noun of limited use like tangle 1 is somewhat remarkable, and needs confirmation" [Century Dictionary]. In reference to material things, from c. 1500. Meaning "to fight with" is American English, first recorded 1928. Related: Tangled; tangling. Tanglefoot (1859) was Western American English slang for "strong whiskey."
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