Etymology
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hands-on (adj.)
by 1969, originally in reference to the use of computers in education; see hand (n.) + on (adv.).
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off-and-on (adv.)

"intermittently, occasionally," 1530s; see off (adv.) + on. As an adjective, "occasional," from 1580s.

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go on (v.)
1580s, "advance, proceed," from go (v.) + on (adv.). Meaning "behave, carry on" is from 1777; especially "to talk volubly" (1863). As an expression of derision by 1886.
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assume (v.)

early 15c., "to arrogate, take upon oneself," from Latin assumere, adsumere "to take up, take to oneself, take besides, obtain in addition," from ad "to, toward, up to" (see ad-) + sumere "to take," from sub "under" (see sub-) + emere "to take," from PIE root *em- "to take, distribute."

Meaning "to suppose, to take for granted without proof as the basis of argument" is first recorded 1590s; that of "to take or put on fictitiously" (an appearance, etc.) is from c. 1600. Related: Assumed; assuming. Early past participle was assumpt. In rhetorical usage, assume expresses what the assumer postulates, often as a confessed hypothesis; presume expresses what the presumer really believes. Middle English also had assumpten "to receive up into heaven" (especially of the Virgin Mary), from the Latin past participle.

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incipient (adj.)
"beginning, commencing," 1660s, from Latin incipientem (nominative incipiens), present participle of incipere "begin, take up; have a beginning, originate," from in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + -cipere, combining form of capere "to take," from PIE root *kap- "to grasp." Related: Incipiently.
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overextend (v.)

also over-extend, "to take on too much" (work, debt, etc.), 1937, from over- + extend. Related: Overextended; overextending.

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repossess (v.)

1550s, "to reoccupy, regain possession of;" see re- "back, again" + possess. Meaning "take back from a purchaser who defaults on payments" is recorded by 1933. Related: Repossessed; repossessing.

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nympholepsy (n.)

"frenzy or rapture supposed to take hold of a man upon gazing on a nymph," 1775, coined by Richard Chandler, in "Travels in Greece," from nymph, on model of epilepsy, with second element from stem of Greek lambanein "to take." Sometimes used in an extended, general sense of "ecstasy or frenzy caused by desire for the unattainable." Ancient Greek had nympholeptos "caught by nymphs." Related: Nympholept; nympholeptic.

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gander (v.)
"take a long look," slang, 1886, from gander (n.) on the notion of craning one's neck like a goose; earlier it meant "to wander foolishly" (1680s). Related: Gandered; gandering.
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inception (n.)

early 15c., "a beginning, a starting," from Old French inception and directly from Latin inceptionem (nominative inceptio) "a beginning; an undertaking," noun of action from past-participle stem of incipere "begin, take in hand," from in- "in, on" (from PIE root *en "in") + -cipere, combining form of capere "take, seize," from PIE root *kap- "to grasp."

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