Etymology
Advertisement
net (v.2)

"to gain as a net sum, produce as clear profit," 1758, from net (adj.). Related: Netted; netting.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
rebate (n.)

1650s, "an allowance by way of discount, deduction from a sum of money to be paid," from rebate (v.). By 1882 as "a repayment, money paid back."

Related entries & more 
-some (2)
suffix added to numerals meaning "a group of (that number)," as in twosome, from pronoun use of Old English sum "some" (see some). Originally a separate word used with the genitive plural (as in sixa sum "six-some"); the inflection disappeared in Middle English and the pronoun was absorbed. Use of some with a number meaning "approximately" also was in Old English.
Related entries & more 
allowance (n.)
late 14c., "praise" (a sense now obsolete), from Old French aloance "sanction, granting, allocation," from aloer "allot, apportion, assign" (see allow). As with allow, the English word involves senses of two different French words.

Meaning "sanction, approval, tolerance" is from 1550s. Sense of "a sum allotted to meet expenses" is from c. 1400. In accounts, meaning "a sum placed to one's credit" is attested from 1520s. Mechanical meaning "permissible deviation from a standard" is from 1903. To make allowances is literally to add or deduct a sum from someone's account for some special circumstance; figurative use of the phrase is attested from 1670s.
Related entries & more 
Fibonacci (adj.)
1891 in reference to a series of numbers in which each is equal to the sum of the preceding two, from name of Leonardo Fibonacci (fl. c. 1200) Tuscan mathematician.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
average (adj.)
1770, "estimated by averaging," from average (n.). By 1803 as "equal in amount to the sum of all particular quantities divided by the number of them," hence "of medium character."
Related entries & more 
overdraw (v.)

c. 1400, overdrauen, "to draw (something) across," from over- + draw (v.). The banking sense of "to draw upon for a sum beyond one's credit" is from 1734. Related: Overdrawn; overdrawing.

Related entries & more 
inclusive (adv.)
"including the stated limits in the number or sum," mid-15c., from Medieval Latin inclusivus, from Latin inclus-, past participle stem of includere "to shut in, enclose" (see include).
Related entries & more 
disaggregate (v.)

"separate into component parts," 1803, from dis- "reverse, opposite of" + aggregate (v.) "bring together in a sum or mass." Related: Disaggregated; disaggregating; disaggregation.

Related entries & more 
aggregate (v.)

c. 1400, "bring together in a sum or mass," from Latin aggregatus, past participle of aggregare "attach, join, include; collect, bring together," literally "bring together in a flock," from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + gregare "to collect into a flock, gather," from grex (genitive gregis) "a flock" (from PIE root *ger- "to gather"). Intransitive meaning "Come together in a sum or mass" is from 1855. Related: Aggregated; aggregating.

Related entries & more 

Page 3