Etymology
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gunnery (n.)
c. 1600, "science of gun-making," from gun + -ery. Meaning "science of firing guns" is from 1816.
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Maxim 

single-barreled water-cooled machine gun, 1885 (Maxim gun), named for inventor, U.S.-born British engineer Sir Hiram S. Maxim (1840-1916).

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Bren 
type of machine gun used by the British army in World War II, 1937, short for Bren gun, coined from first letters of Brno, Czechoslovakia, and Enfield, near London. The patent was purchased in Brno, and the gun was manufactured in Enfield.
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Tommy 
"British soldier," 1884, from Thomas Atkins, since 1815 the typical sample name for filling in army forms. Tommy gun (1929) is short for Thompson gun (see Thompson). Soon extended to other types of sub-machine gun, especially those favored by the mob.
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gunboat (n.)
also gun-boat, "small boat fitted with guns for service inshore or up rivers," 1793, from gun (n.) + boat (n.). Gunboat diplomacy is from 1916, originally with reference to Western policies in China.
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misfire (v.)

1752, of a gun, "to fail in firing;" by 1893 of an internal combustion engine; see mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + fire (v.). Perhaps the first element is miss (v.); to miss fire, of a gun, is attested by 1727. Related: Misfired; misfiring. Figurative use by 1942. The noun is attested from 1839 in reference to a gun or cannon.

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unlimber (v.)
1760, "to free (a gun) from its limber," usually for the purpose of bringing it into action, from un- (2) "opposite of" + limber "attach a gun to its limber" (see limber (n.)). Figurative sense is attested from 1864. Related: Unlimbered; unlimbering.
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Thompson (n.)
type of sub-machine gun, 1919, named for U.S. Gen. John T. Thompson (1860-1940), who conceived it and whose company financed it. Familiarly Tommy gun by 1929.
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rifle (v.2)

in gun-making, "to cut spiral grooves in" (the bore of a gun barrel), 1630s, probably from French rifler, from Old French rifler "to scratch or groove" (see rifle (v.1)). Related: Rifled; rifling.

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scattershot (adj.)

1959, figurative use of term for a kind of gun charge meant to broadly spread the pellets when fired (1940), from scatter (v.) + shot (n.). Scatter-gun "shotgun" dates to 1836.

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