Etymology
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onomastics (n.)

"scientific study of names and naming," by 1930, from onomastic; also see -ics.

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biometrics (n.)
"application of statistics and mathematics to the study of biology," 1902, from biometry (also see -ics).
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learning (n.)
Old English leornung "study, action of acquiring knowledge," verbal noun from leornian (see learn). Meaning "knowledge acquired by systematic study, extensive literary and scientific culture" is from mid-14c. Learning curve attested by 1907.
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pedology (n.)

"scientific study of the soil," 1924, from German pedologie (1862) or French pédologie (1899), ultimately from Greek pedon "ground, earth" (from suffixed form of PIE root *ped- "foot") + -logy. Related: Pedological. Earlier it was a word for "the study of children" (1894), from pedo-.

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sociobiology (n.)
"study of the biological basis of social behavior," 1946, from socio- + biology. Related: Sociobiological.
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cardiology (n.)
"the study of the heart," 1847, from cardio- + -logy. Cardiologist attested from 1885.
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paleozoology (n.)

"study of extinct or fossil animals," 1845, from paleo- + zoology.

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archaeology (n.)
c. 1600, "ancient history," from French archéologie (16c.) or directly from Greek arkhaiologia "the study of ancient things;" see archaeo- + -ology. Meaning "scientific study of ancient peoples and past civilizations" is recorded by 1825.
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psychology (n.)
Origin and meaning of psychology

1650s, "the study of the soul," from Modern Latin psychologia, probably coined mid-16c. in Germany by Melanchthon from Latinized form of Greek psykhē "breath, spirit, soul" (see psyche) + logia "study of" (see -logy). The meaning "science or study of the phenomena of the mind" is attested by 1748, in reference to Christian Wolff's "Psychologia empirica" (1732). The modern behavioral sciences sense is from the early 1890s.

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museum (n.)

1610s, "the university building in Alexandria," from Latin museum "library, study," from Greek mouseion "place of study, library or museum, school of art or poetry," originally "a temple or shrine of the Muses," from Mousa "Muse" (see muse (n.)). The earliest use in reference to English institutions was of libraries for scholarly study (1640s); the sense of "building or part of a building set aside as a repository and display place for objects relating to art, literature, or science" is recorded by 1680s.

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