Etymology
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backlash (n.)
1815, of machinery, "reaction of wheels on each other produced by an inconstant load," from back (adj.) + lash (n.) "a blow, stroke." In metaphoric sense, it is attested from 1929.
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flapdoodle (n.)
1833, originally "the stuff they feed fools on" [Marryat]; probably an arbitrary formation from elements meant to sound ridiculous, perhaps with allusions to flap "a stroke, blow" and doodle "fool, simpleton."
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demulcent (adj.)

"soothing, allaying irritation;" as a noun, "a medicine which assuages the effects of irritation," 1732, from Latin demulcentem (nominative demulcens), present participle of demulcere "to stroke down, soothingly pet," from de "down" (see de-) + mulcere "to stroke, caress," from PIE *m(o)lk-eie- "to touch repeatedly," source also of Sanskrit mrsase "to touch." De Vaan writes that connection with *meig-, the root of mulgere "to milk," "is possible, but unproven." The obsolete verb demulce "soothe, soften, mollify" is attested from 1520s.

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tap (n.2)
"light blow or stroke," mid-14c., from tap (v.1). Tap dancer first recorded 1927, from tap (n.) in the sense of "metal plate over the heel of a shoe" (1680s).
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pet (v.)
1620s, "treat as a pet," from pet (n.1). Sense of "to stroke" is first found 1818. Slang sense of "kiss and caress" is from 1920 (implied in petting). Related: Petted.
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beaucoup 
French, literally "a great heap" (13c.), from beau "fine, great" (see beau (n.)) + coup "a stroke," also "a throw," hence, "a heap" (see coup (n.)). Compare Spanish golpe "multitude," from the same Latin source.
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caress (v.)
"bestow caresses upon, stroke or pat affectionately;" also "treat with fondness or kindness," 1650s, from French caresser, from Italian carezzare "to cherish," from carezza "endearment" (see caress (n.)). Related: Caressed; caressing.
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hatch (v.2)
"engrave, draw fine parallel lines," late 14c., from Old French hachier "chop up, hack" (14c.), from hache "ax" (see hatchet). Related: Hatched; hatching. The noun meaning "an engraved line or stroke" is from 1650s.
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palpebral (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the eyelids," by 1756, from Late Latin palpebralis, from Latin palpebra "the eyelids," which is probably from palpare "to stroke" (see palpable), perhaps via an unrecorded verb *palpere "to move repeatedly."

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wacky (adj.)
"crazy, eccentric," 1935, variant of whacky (n.) "fool," late 1800s British slang, probably ultimately from whack "a blow, stroke," from the notion of being whacked on the head one too many times.
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