Etymology
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debility (n.)

"state or condition of being weak or feeble, lack of strength or vigor," early 15c., from Old French debilite (Modern French débilité) or directly from Latin debilitatem (nominative debilitas) "a laming, crippling, weakening," from debilis "lame, disabled, crippled," figuratively "weak, helpless," from de "from, away" (see de-) + -bilis "strength," from PIE root *bel- "strong" (see Bolshevik).

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nourishing (adj.)

"promoting strength or growth," late 14c., norishing, present-participle adjective from nourish (v.).

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nerve (v.)
c. 1500, "to ornament with threads;" see nerve (n.). Meaning "to give strength or vigor" is from 1749. Related: Nerved; nerving.
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invalidate (v.)

"destroy the strength or validity of, render of no force or effect," 1640s, from invalid (adj.2) + -ate (2). Related: Invalidated; invalidating.

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beef up (v.)
"add strength," 1941, from college slang, from beef (n.) in slang sense of "muscle-power" (1851).
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jism (n.)
"seminal fluid, cum," 1899; earlier "energy, strength" (1842), of uncertain origin; see jazz (n.).
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asthenic (adj.)
"characterized by debility, weak," 1788, from Latinized form of Greek asthenikos, asthenes "weak, without strength, feeble" (see asthenia).
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fortitudinous (adj.)
"capable of endurance," 1752, from Latin fortitudinem (nominative fortitudo) "strength, firmness" (see fortitude) + -ous. Related: Fortitudinously.
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body-builder (n.)

by 1916 as "one devoted to cultivating fitness and strength," from body (n.) + builder. Used earlier in reference to healthful nutriments and coach-body makers. Related: Body-building (by 1892, perhaps 1881, in the "training for physical strength and fitness" sense, said to have been coined by R. J. Roberts, superintendent of the Boston Y.M.C.A. gymnasium).

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Valencia 
place in Spain, Roman Valentia Edetanorum "fort of the Edetani," a local people name; the first element from Latin valentia "strength" (see valence (n.)).
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