Etymology
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bean-stalk (n.)
also beanstalk, "stem of a bean plant," 1800 (in the story of Jack and the giant), from bean (n.) + stalk (n.).
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narrative (n.)

"a tale, a story, a connected account of the particulars of an event or series of incidents," 1560s, from French narrative and from narrative (adj.).

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rancher (n.)

1836, "owner of a ranch, person engaged in ranching;" see ranch (n.). Meaning "modern single-story house" is attested by 1955.

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tec (n.)
1879 in thieves' slang as short for detective (n.); 1934 as short for detective story.
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sob (n.)
late 14c., from sob (v.). Sob story is from 1913. Sob sister "female journalist who writes sentimental stories or advice columns" is from 1912.
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marathon (n.)

1896, marathon race, from story of Greek hero Pheidippides, who in 490 B.C.E. ran to Athens from the Plains of Marathon to tell of the allied Greek victory there over Persian army. The original story (Herodotus) is that he ran from Athens to Sparta to seek aid, which arrived too late to participate in the battle.

It was introduced as an athletic event in the 1896 revival of the Olympic Games, based on a later, less likely story, that Pheidippides ran to Athens from the battlefield with news of the victory. The word quickly was extended to mean "any very long event or activity." The place name is literally "fennel-field." Related: Marathoner (by 1912); Marathonian.

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Ruth 
fem. proper name, biblical ancestor of David, from Hebrew Ruth, probably a contraction of reuth "companion, friend, fellow woman." The Old Testament book tells her story.
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bedtime (n.)
also bed-time, "the usual hour of going to rest," early 13c., from bed (n.) + time (n.). Bed-time story attested from 1867.
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joepye-weed (n.)
1818, said to be so called from the name of an Indian who used it to cure typhus in New England. The story dates from 1822.
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saga (n.)

1709, "ancient Scandinavian legend of considerable length," an antiquarians' revival to describe the medieval prose narratives of Iceland and Norway, from Old Norse saga "saga, story," cognate with Old English sagu "a saying" (see saw (n.2)).

Properly a long narrative composition of Iceland or Norway in the Middle Ages featuring heroic adventure and fantastic journeys, or one that has their characteristics. The extended meaning "long, convoluted story" is by 1857.

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