Etymology
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casserole (n.)

1706, "stew pan," from French casserole "sauce pan" (16c.), diminutive of casse "pan" (14c.), from Provençal cassa "melting pan," from Medieval Latin cattia "pan, vessel," possibly from Greek kyathion, diminutive of kyathos "cup for the wine bowl." Originally the pan; by 1889 also of the dishes cooked in it, via cookery phrases such as en casserole, à la casserole.

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Irish (adj.)
c. 1200, Irisce, "of Irish nationality;" see Irish (n.). Irish stew is attested from 1814; Irish lace is from 1851; Irish coffee is from 1950. Meaning "Irish in nature or character," it is attested from 1580s, and until 19c. often meaning "contradictory." In later use often mocking or dismissive, such as Irish apricot "potato," Irish daisy "common dandelion."
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giblets (n.)
"edible entrails of a fowl, parts removed or trimmed from a fowl when it is prepared for roasting," mid-15c. (in singular, gybelet), earlier "unnecessary appendage" (c. 1300), from Old French gibelet "game stew," a cookery word of uncertain origin; perhaps from Frankish *gabaiti "hunting with falcons," related to Old High German beizan "to fly a falcon," literally "to cause to bite," from bizzan "to bite," from PIE root *bheid- "to split," with derivatives in Germanic referring to biting.
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brose (n.)
Scottish dish of boiling milk, liquid in which meat has been broiled, seasoning, etc., poured over oatmeal or barley meal, 1650s, Scottish, earlier browes, from Old French broez, nominative of broet (13c.) "stew, soup made from meat broth," diminutive of breu, from Medieval Latin brodium, from Old High German brod "broth" (see broth). Athol brose (1801) was "honey and whisky mixed together in equal parts," taken as a cure for hoarseness or sore throat.
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ragout (n.)

"highly seasoned meat and vegetable stew," 1650s, from French ragoût (mid-17c.), from ragoûter "awaken the appetite," from Old French re- "back" (see re-) + à "to" + goût "taste," from Latin gustum (nominative gustus), related to gustare "to taste, take a little of" (from PIE root *geus- "to taste; to choose"). Figuratively, of any spicy mixture, by 1670s. The name of ragu, the type of spicy pasta sauce from Bologna, is a 17c. Italian borrowing of the French word.

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paella (n.)

Spanish dish of rice with chicken and other meat, seafood, vegetables, etc., cooked together in a large, flat pan, 1892, from Catalan paella, from Old French paele "cooking or frying pan" (Modern French poêle), from Latin patella "small pan, little dish, platter," diminutive of patina "broad shallow pan, stew-pan" (see pan (n.)). So called for the pan in which it is cooked.

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Mulligan (n.)

surname, from Gaelic Maolagan, Old Irish Maelecan, a double diminutive of mael "bald," hence "the little bald (or shaven) one," probably often a reference to a monk or disciple. As "stew made with whatever's available" (1904) it is hobo slang, probably from the proper name. The golf sense of "extra stroke after a poor shot" (1949) is sometimes said to be from the name of a Canadian golfer in the 1920s whose friends gave him an extra shot in gratitude for driving them over rough roads to their weekly foursome at St. Lambert Country Club near Montreal.

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gallimaufry (n.)
"a medley, hash, hodge-podge," 1550s, from French galimafrée "hash, ragout, dish made of odds and ends," from Old French galimafree, calimafree "sauce made of mustard, ginger, and vinegar; a stew of carp" (14c.), which is of unknown origin. Perhaps from Old French galer "to make merry, live well" (see gallant) + Old North French mafrer "to eat much," from Middle Dutch maffelen [Klein]. Weekley sees in the second element the proper name Maufré. Hence, figuratively, "any inconsistent or absurd medley."
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patina (n.)

"greenish encrustation on old bronze," 1748, from French patine (18c.), from Italian patina. This appears to be from Latin patina "shallow pan, dish, stew-pan" (from Greek patane "plate, dish," from PIE *pet-ano-, from root *pete- "to spread"), but it is uncertain why, as patina was found on many ancient objects other than bronze plates and pans. It was considered to add greatly to the beauty of antique bronzes, hence the sense of "refinement, cultural sophistication" recorded by 1933. Extended by the 1890s to the surface textures of other works of decorative arts.

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gravy (n.)

late 14c. (early 14c. in Anglo-French), from Old French grave, graue, apparently a misspelling of grané "sauce, stew," with -n- misread for -u- — the character used for -v- in medial positions in words in medieval manuscripts. The French word probably originally meant "properly grained, seasoned," from Latin granum "grain, seed" (see grain (n.)).

The meaning "money easily acquired" is attested by 1910; gravy train (by 1899) as something lucrative or productive is said to have been originally railroad slang for a short haul that paid well. Gravy-boat "small, deep dish for holding gravy or sauce" is from 1827.

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