Etymology
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mandate (n.)
Origin and meaning of mandate

c. 1500, "a command, a judicial or legal order," from French mandat (15c.) and directly from Latin mandatum "commission, command, order," noun use of neuter past participle of mandare "to order, commit to one's charge," literally "to give into one's hand," probably from manus "hand" (from PIE root *man- (2) "hand") + dare "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give").

Political sense of "approval supposedly conferred by voters to the policies or slogans advocated by winners of an election" is from 1796. League of Nations sense "commission issued by the League authorizing a selected power to administer and develop a territory for a specified purpose" (also used of the territory so specified) is from 1919.

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committal (n.)

1620s, "committing, commission" (of an offense, etc.), from commit + -al (2). Meaning "act of entrusting or giving in charge" is by 1830; that of "action of committing oneself" is from 1835. As an adjective, attested from 1884, apparently a back-formation from non-committal (q.v.).

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captaincy (n.)
"rank or commission of a captain," 1818, from captain (n.) on the model of lieutenancy or some similar word where the -c- is etymologically justified. Earlier words in the same sense were captainry (1520s), captainship (mid-15c.).
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brevet (n.)
mid-14c., from Old French brievet "letter, note, piece of paper; papal indulgence" (13c.), diminutive of bref "letter, note" (see brief (n.)). Military sense of "a commission to a higher rank without advance in command" (for meritorious service, etc.) is from 1680s.
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encomienda (n.)
"estate granted to a Spaniard in America with powers to tax the Indians," 1810, from Spanish, literally "commission," from or related to encomendar "to commit, charge," from assimilated form of Latin in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + Medieval Latin commendam, from Latin commendare "commit to one's care, commend" (see commend).
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assignment (n.)
late 14c., "an order, request, directive," from Old French assignement "(legal) assignment (of dower, etc.)," from Late Latin assignamentum, noun of action from Latin assignare/adsignare "to allot, assign, award" (see assign). Meaning "appointment to office" is mid-15c.; that of "a task assigned (to someone), commission" is by 1848.
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mandatary (n.)

"person to whom a mandate has been given, one who receives a command or charge," 1610s, from Late Latin mandatarius "one to whom a charge or commission has been given," from Latin mandatus, past participle of mandare "to order, commit to one's charge" (see mandate (n.)).

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skew (v.)
late 15c., "to turn aside" (intransitive), from Old North French eskiuer "shy away from, avoid," Old French eschiver (see eschew). Transitive sense of "turn (something) aside" is from 1570s. Meaning "depict unfairly" first recorded 1872, on notion of being "give oblique direction to," hence "to distort, to make slant." Statistical sense dates from 1929. Related: Skewed; skewing. The adjectival meaning "slanting, turned to one side" is recorded from c. 1600, from the verb; noun meaning "slant, deviation" first attested 1680s.
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privateer (n.)

1660s, "private man of war, armed vessel owned and officered by private persons, usually acting under commission from the state," from private (adj.), probably on model of volunteer (n.), buccaneer. From 1670s as "one commanding or serving on a privateer." As a verb, 1660s (implied in privateering) "to cruise on a privateer, to seize or annoy an enemy's ships and commerce."

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deviation (n.)

late 14c., "a going astray, a turning aside from the (right) way or course, a going wrong, error," from Late Latin deviatus, past participle of deviare "turn aside, turn out of the way," from Latin phrase de via, from de "off, away" (see de-) + via "way" (see via). From 1630s as "departure from a certain standard or rule of conduct or original plan." Statistical sense is from 1858; standard deviation is from 1894. Related: Deviational.

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