Etymology
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restate (v.)

also re-state, "express over again or in a new way," 1713, from re- "again" + state (v.). Related: Restated; restating.

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parastate (n.)

also para-state, "institution or body which takes on some of the roles of civil government," 1959, from para- (1) "beside" + state (n.). Related: Parastatal.

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stately (adj.)

"noble, splendid," late 14c., from -ly (1) + state (n.1) in a sense of "costly and imposing display" (such as benefits a person of rank and wealth), attested from early 14c. This sense also is preserved in the phrase lie in state "be ceremoniously exposed to view before interment" (1705). Hence also stateroom. Related: Stateliness.

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interstate (adj.)

1838, American English, in reference to traffic in slaves, from inter- "between" + state (n.) in the U.S. sense. Interstate commerce is that carried on by persons in one U.S. state with persons in another. Noun sense of "an interstate highway" is attested by 1975, American English.

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modernization (n.)

"act of modernizing; state of being modernized," 1743, noun of action or state from modernize.

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brutalization (n.)

"act of brutalizing; state of being brutalized;" 1797, noun of action or state from brutalize.

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maidenhood (n.)

"state of being a maiden; state of an unmarried female; virginity," Old English mægdenhad; see maiden (n.) + -hood.

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rabidity (n.)

1822, "state of being infected with rabies;" 1825, "state of being furious or violently raving;" see rabid + -ity.

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lowliness (n.)

early 15c., "meek or humble state of mind," from lowly + -ness. From 1590s as "humble state or condition."

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fitness (n.)

1570s, "state or quality of being suitable," from fit (adj.) + -ness. Meaning "state of being physically fit" is from 1935.

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