Etymology
Advertisement
No results were found for splenial. Showing results for special.
charter (v.)

early 15c., "provide with a charter," from charter (n.). Meaning "to hire by special contract" is attested from 1806. Related: Chartered; chartering.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
jam (n.1)
"fruit preserve," 1730s, probably a special use of jam (v.) "press objects close together," hence "crush fruit into a preserve."
Related entries & more 
feature (v.)
1755, "to resemble, have features resembling," from feature (n.). The sense of "make special display or attraction of" is 1888; entertainment sense from 1897. Related: Featured; featuring.
Related entries & more 
noted (adj.)

c. 1300, "observed," past-participle adjective from note (v.). Meaning "observed for some special quality, conspicuous, distinguished" is from mid-15c. Related: Notedness.

Related entries & more 
earmark (v.)
1590s, "to identify by an earmark," from earmark (n.). Meaning "to set aside money for a special purpose" is attested by 1868. Related: Earmarked; earmarking.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
partisan (adj.)

1708 in a military sense, "engaged on a special enterprise;" 1842 in politics, "of or pertaining to a party or faction;" from partisan (n.).

Related entries & more 
putt (n.)

1660s, originally figurative, "a putting, pushing, shoving, thrusting," special Scottish use and pronunciation of put (n.). Golfing sense of "to play with a putter" is from 1743.

Related entries & more 
leet (n.1)
in reference to special court proceedings, late 13c., from Anglo-French lete, Anglo-Latin leta, of unknown origin; OED suggests possible connection to let (v.).
Related entries & more 
insider (n.)
"one in possession of special information by virtue of being within some organization," 1848, from inside (n.) + -er (1). Originally in reference to the stock markets.
Related entries & more 
generic (adj.)
1670s, "belonging to a large group of objects," formed in English from Latin gener-, stem of genus "race, kind" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups) + -ic. Hence "of a general kind, not special. In reference to manufactured products, "not special; not brand-name; in plain, cheap packaging," is from 1953 of drugs; of groceries, etc., from 1977. Related: Generically.
Related entries & more 

Page 3