Etymology
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ghostly (adj.)

Old English gastlic "spiritual, holy, not of the flesh; clerical;" also "supernatural, spectral, pertaining to or characteristic of a ghost;" see ghost (n.) + -ly (1). Related: Ghostliness.

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regenerate (adj.)

"reborn, reproduced, restored," mid-15c., from Latin regeneratus, past participle of regenerare "bring forth again" (see regeneration). Especially in theology, "changed from a natural to a spiritual state."

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New Age (adj.)

1971, in reference to a modern spiritual movement, from new + age (n.). It had been used at various times at least since the 1840s.

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barrenness (n.)

late 14c., "incapacity for child-bearing" (of women); "unproductivity, unfruitfulness" (of land); earlier in a figurative sense ("spiritual emptiness," mid-14c.); from barren + -ness.

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blessing (n.)

Middle English blessinge, from Old English bletsunga, bledsunge, "divine grace; protecting influence (of a deity, saint); state of spiritual well-being or joy;" also of a sanction or benediction of the Pope, a priest, etc.; verbal noun from bless. The meaning "a gift from God, that which gives temporal or spiritual benefit" is from mid-14c. In the sense of "religious invocation before a meal" it is recorded from 1738. Phrase blessing in disguise is recorded from 1746.

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maharishi (n.)

Hindu sage or holy man, 1785, from Sanskrit, from maha "great" (from PIE root *meg- "great") + rishi "inspired sage." In general use, a title for a popular spiritual leader.

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newness (n.)

"state or quality of being new," Middle English neuenesse, "something new-made, new doctrines, new spiritual life," from Old English neownysse; see new + -ness.

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Ouija 

1891, a trademark name (originally by Kennard Novelty Co., Baltimore, Md.) for a "talking board" with a planchette, used to record spiritual messages, etc.; the name is compounded from French oui and German ja, both meaning "yes."

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biogen (n.)

1882, "hypothetical soul-stuff, the substance of a proposed spiritual body," coined by U.S. scientist Elliott Coues; see bio- + -gen. From 1899 as "hypothetical protoplasmic unit," from German Biogen (1895). Related: Biogenetic; biogenation.

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earthly (adj.)

Old English eorþlic "worldly, pertaining to this world" (as opposed to spiritual or heavenly); see earth (n.) + -ly (1). The sense "belonging to or originating in the earth" is from mid-15c.

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