Etymology
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slop (v.)
"to spill carelessly" (transitive), 1550s, from slop (n.1). Intransitive sense from 1746. Related: Slopped; slopping.
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spilth (n.)
"that which is spilled," c. 1600, from spill (v.) + -th (2). Used, once, by Shakespeare.
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spillage (n.)
1838, from spill (v.) + -age. Shakespeare used spilth "that which has spilled, act of spilling" ("Timon," 1607), which was picked up by Browning, etc.
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swash (v.)
1580s, "spill or splash (water) about," 1530s, possibly from wash (v.) with an intensifying s-, or imitative of the sound of water dashing against solid objects. Related: Swashed; swashing.
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gaff (n.2)
"talk," 1812, in phrase blow the gaff "spill a secret," of uncertain origin. OED points out Old English gafspræc "blasphemous or ribald speech," and Scottish gaff "loud, rude talk" (by 1825). Compare gaffe.
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slattern (n.)
1630s, "a woman negligent or disordered in her dress or household," of uncertain origin, probably related to Low German Slattje, Dutch slodder, dialectal Swedish slata "slut" (in the older, non-sexual sense; compare slut). Compare dialectal English verb slatter "to spill or splash awkwardly, to waste," used of women or girls considered untidy or slovenly.
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spald (v.)
c. 1400, "to splinter, chip" (transitive; spalding-knife is from mid-14c.), of uncertain origin, perhaps from Middle Dutch spalden, cognate with Middle Low German spalden, Old High German spaltan, German spalten "to split" (see spill (v.)). The later form of the verb is spall (1758), from or by influence of the noun. Related: Spalled; spalling.
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effuse (v.)

"to pour out, spill," late 14c., from French effuser or directly from Latin effusus "poured out," past participle of effundere "pour forth, spread abroad; to lavish, squander, waste," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fundere "to pour" (from nasalized form of PIE root *gheu- "to pour"). Related: Effused; effusing. Not to be confused with eff youse.

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overcompensate (v.)

also over-compensate, "compensate excessively," 1758 (implied in over-compensated), from over- + compensate. Related: Over-compensating.

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overestimate (v.)

also over-estimate, "estimate too highly, overvalue," 1768, from over- + estimate (v.). Related: Over-estimated; over-estimating.

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