Etymology
Advertisement
No results were found for sphex. Showing results for speed.
Mach 
measure of speed relative to the speed of sound (technically Mach number), 1937, named in honor of Austrian physicist Ernst Mach (1838-1916).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
supersonic (adj.)
1919, "of or having to do with sound waves beyond the limit of human hearing," from super- + sonic. Attested from 1934 in sense of "exceeding the speed of sound" (especially as a measure of aircraft speed), leaving the original sense to ultrasonic (1923).
Related entries & more 
post-haste (adv.)

"with urgent speed, with all possible haste," 1590s, from a noun (1530s) meaning "great speed," usually said to be from "post haste," an instruction formerly written on letters (attested from 1530s), from post (adv.) + haste (n.). The phrase originated in the old system of relaying messages by post horses (see post (n.3)); the verb post "to ride or travel with great speed" is recorded from 1550s.

Related entries & more 
Metroliner (n.)
U.S. high-speed inter-city train, 1969, from metropolitan + liner.
Related entries & more 
jazz (v.)
"to speed or liven up," 1917, from jazz (n.). Related: jazzed; jazzing.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
flywheel (n.)
also fly-wheel, "heavy-rimmed revolving wheel to regulate motion," 1784, from fly (n.) "speed-regulating device" (1590s, from fly (v.1)) + wheel (n.).
Related entries & more 
tachy- 
word-forming element meaning "rapid, swift, fast," from Latinized combining form of Greek takhys "swift, rapid, hasty," related to takhos "speed, swiftness," of uncertain origin.
Related entries & more 
accelerando (adv.)

musical instruction indicating a passage to be played with gradually increasing speed, 1842, from Italian accelerando, present participle of accelerare, from Latin accelerare "to hasten, quicken" (see accelerate).

Related entries & more 
quickness (n.)

c. 1200, quiknesse, "state of being alive," from quick (adj.) + -ness. Early 15c. as "alacrity, speed, rapidity;" mid-15c. as "readiness of perception, keenness of mind."

Related entries & more 
race (v.)

c. 1200, rasen "to rush," from a Scandinavian source akin to the source of race (n.1), reinforced by the noun in English and by Old English cognate ræsan "to rush headlong, hasten, enter rashly." Transitive meaning "run swiftly" is from 1757. Meaning "run against in a competition of speed" is from 1809. Transitive sense of "cause to run" is from 1860. In reference to an engine, etc., "run with uncontrolled speed," from 1862; transitive sense is by 1932. Related: Raced; racing.

Related entries & more 

Page 3