Etymology
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-phemia 

word-forming element meaning "speech," from Greek -phemia, from phēmē "speech," from stem of phemi "I speak," cognate with Latin fari "to speak," fama "report, reputation" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say").

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contradict (v.)
Origin and meaning of contradict

1570s, "speak against, oppose" (a sense now obsolete); 1580s, "assert the contrary or opposite of," from Latin contradictus, past participle of contradicere, in classical Latin contra dicere "to speak against," from contra "against" (see contra (prep., adv.)) + dicere "to say, speak" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly").

Meaning "deny the words or assertions of, speak in contradiction" is from c. 1600. Of statements, etc., "be inconsistent with," c. 1600. Related: Contradicted; contradicting; contradictive.

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interlocution (n.)
"interchange of speech, dialogue, action of talking and replying," 1530s, from Latin interlocutionem (nominative interlocutio) "a speaking between, interlocution," noun of action from past participle stem of interloqui "to speak between; to interrupt," from inter "between" (see inter-) + loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak").
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somniloquy (n.)
talking in one's sleep, 1847, from somni- "sleep" + -loquy, from Latin loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak"). Related: Somniloquence (1814); somniloquent (1804, Coleridge); somniloquist; somniloquous; somniloquize.
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apophatic (adj.)

"involving a mention of something one feigns to deny; involving knowledge obtained by negation," 1850, from Latinized form of Greek apophatikos, from apophasis "denial, negation," from apophanai "to speak off," from apo "off, away from" (see apo-) + phanai "to speak," related to phēmē "voice" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say").

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affable (adj.)
of persons, "open to conversation or approach," late 15c., from Old French affable "benign, approachable" (14c.), from Latin affabilis "approachable, courteous, kind, friendly," literally "who can be (easily) spoken to," from affari "to speak to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + fari "to speak," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say." Related: Affably.
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vaniloquence (n.)
"idle talk," 1620s, from Latin vaniloquentia, from vanus "idle, empty" (from suffixed form of PIE root *eue- "to leave, abandon, give out") + loquens, from loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak").
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loquacious (adj.)
1660s, a back-formation from loquacity, or else formed from stem of Latin loquax (genitive loquacis) "talkative," from loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak") + -ous. Compare French loquace, Spanish locuaz. Related: Loquaciously; loquaciousness.
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grandiloquence (n.)
"lofty speaking or expression," 1580s, from Latin grandiloquentia, from grandiloquus "using lofty speech, bombastic," from grandis "big" (see grand (adj.)) + -loquus "speaking," from loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak").
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-phone 

word-forming element meaning "voice, sound," also "speaker of," from Greek phōnē "voice, sound," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, say, tell" (source also of Latin for, fari "to speak," fama "talk, report").

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