Etymology
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dory (n.1)

"small, flat-bottomed boat," especially one sent out from a larger vessel to catch fish, 1709, American English, perhaps from a West Indian or Central American Indian language.

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geoduck (n.)

edible Pacific clam, 1883, perhaps from an American Indian word.

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cayuse (n.)

"horse, Indian pony of the northern Rockies," 1841, American English, said to be a Chinook (native Pacific Northwest) word; also the name of an Indian group and language (1825); of unknown origin.

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redskin (n.)

"North American Indian," 1690s, from red (adj.1) + skin (n.). "(Not the preferred term.)" [OED]. Red as the skin color of Native Americans is from 1580s; red man "North American Indian" is from 1580s.

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Crow 

Indian tribe of the American Midwest, the name is a rough translation of their own name, Apsaruke.

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Amerind (n.)

1899, coined by Maj. John Wesley Powell at the Bureau of American Ethnology, where he was director, from American + Indian.

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hogan (n.)

Navaho Indian dwelling, 1871, American English, from Athapaskan (Navaho) hoghan "dwelling, house."

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catalpa (n.)

type of large-leaved North American tree with winged seeds, c. 1740, from an American Indian language of the Carolinas, perhaps Creek (Muskogean) /katalpa/, literally "head-wing."

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condor (n.)

"large, South American bird of prey," c. 1600, from American Spanish, from Quechua (Inca) cuntur, the native name for the bird.

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dat 

representing the pronunciation of that in West Indian, Irish, or African-American vernacular speech, from 1680s.

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