Etymology
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dal (n.)

sort of vetch cultivated in the East Indies, 1690s, from Hindi dal "split pulse," from Sanskrit dala, from dal "to split."

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intergalactic (adj.)

1928, in reference to galaxies as presently understood, from inter- + galactic. The word itself was in use by 1901, when galaxies were thought to be a sort of nebulae.

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anorak (n.)

Eskimo's waterproof, hooded jacket, 1924, from Greenland Eskimo anoraq. Applied to Western imitations of this garment from 1930s. In British slang, "socially inept person" (Partridge associates it with a fondness for left-wing politics and pirate radio), by 1983, on the notion that that sort of person typically wears this sort of coat.

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undertaker (n.)

c. 1400, "a contractor or projecter of any sort," agent noun from undertake (v.). The specialized sense (1690s) emerged from funeral-undertaker.

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pipe dream (n.)

the sort of improbable fantasy one has while smoking opium, 1870, from pipe (n.1) in the smoking sense + dream (n.). Old English pipdream meant "piping," from dream in the sense of "music."

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whatsoever (pron.)

"of whatever nature, kind, or sort," mid-13c., quuat-so-euere, from whatso "whatever" (c. 1200; see what), an emphatic referring to things, + ever. A double intensive of what. As an adjective from mid-15c.

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poteen (n.)

"whiskey made in Ireland," especially the strong sort distilled privately and illicitly, 1812, from Irish poitin "little pot" (suggesting distillation in small quantities), from English pot (n.1) "vessel" + diminutive suffix -in, -een.

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black box (n.)

1947, RAF slang for "navigational instruments;" later extended to any sort of apparatus that operates in a sealed container. Especially of flight recorders from c. 1964.

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boutique (n.)

"trendy fashion shop," 1950, earlier "small shop of any sort" (1767), from French boutique (14c.), from Old Provençal botica, from Latin apotheca "storehouse" (see apothecary). Latin apotheca directly into French normally would have yielded *avouaie.

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automotive (adj.)

"pertaining to automobiles," 1898, a hybrid from auto- "self," from Greek, and motive (adj.), from Latin. Used earlier as a noun (1865) in reference to some sort of helicopter-like device.

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