Etymology
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eye-service (n.)
"work done only under inspection or while the master is watching," 1530s, from eye (n.) + service (n.1). Related: Eye-servant.
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eye-shot (n.)
also eyeshot, "range of vision," 1580s, from eye (n.) + shot (n.) in the sense of "range" (as in bowshot).
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aslant (adv.)
"in a sloping direction, not permendicular or at right angles," early 14c., o-slant, literally "on slant," from a- (1) "on" + slant (v.). As a preposition from c. 1600.
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slantways (adv.)
1826, from slant (n.) + way (n.) + adverbial genitive -s.
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embrasure (n.)
"enlargement of the interior aperture of a door or window," 1702, from French embrasure (16c.), from Old French embraser "to cut at a slant, make a groove or furrow in a door or window," from assimilated form of en- "in" (see en- (1)) + braser "to cut at a slant."
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incline (n.)
c. 1600, "mental tendency," from incline (v.). The literal meaning "slant, slope" is attested from 1846 in railroading.
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slope (n.)
1610s, "inclination," from slope (v.). Meaning "an incline, a slant (of ground)" is from 1620s. Derogatory slang meaning "Oriental person" is attested from 1948.
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oculist (n.)

"eye doctor," 1610s, from French oculiste (16c.), from Latin oculus "an eye" (from PIE root *okw- "to see"). Middle English had oculister (early 15c.) "an authority on the eye and treatment of eye diseases."

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clino- 
before vowels clin-, word-forming element meaning "slope, slant, incline," from Latinized form of Greek klinein "to lean, slope," from PIE root *klei- "to lean."
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skew (v.)
late 15c., "to turn aside" (intransitive), from Old North French eskiuer "shy away from, avoid," Old French eschiver (see eschew). Transitive sense of "turn (something) aside" is from 1570s. Meaning "depict unfairly" first recorded 1872, on notion of being "give oblique direction to," hence "to distort, to make slant." Statistical sense dates from 1929. Related: Skewed; skewing. The adjectival meaning "slanting, turned to one side" is recorded from c. 1600, from the verb; noun meaning "slant, deviation" first attested 1680s.
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