Etymology
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musician (n.)

late 14c., musicien, "one skilled in music," from Old French musicien (14c.), or a native formation from music + -ian. Sense of "professional musical performer" is attested from mid-15c.

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retrain (v.)

also re-train, "train again, teach (someone already skilled or trained) a new skill," 1905, from re- "back, again" + train (v.). Related: Retrained; retraining.

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magician (n.)

late 14c., "one skilled in magic or sorcery," from Old French magiciien "magician, sorcerer," from magique (see magic (n.)). As "practitioner of legerdemain," by 1590s.

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financier (n.)

1610s, "one concerned with finances" (especially public), from French financier (16c.), from finance (see finance (n.)). Sense of "capitalist, one skilled in financial operations" is first recorded 1867.

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inventive (adj.)

early 15c., "skilled in invention," from Old French inventif (15c.), from Latin invent-, past-participle stem of invenire "devise, discover, find" (see invention). Related: Inventively; inventiveness.

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gymnastic (adj.)

1570s, "pertaining to athletic exercise," from Latin gymnasticus, from Greek gymnastikos "fond of or skilled in bodily exercise," from gymnazein "to exercise or train" (see gymnasium).

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penman (n.)

590s, "one who writes a good hand, one skilled in penmanship;" 1610s, "copyist, clerk, scrivener" (obsolete), from pen (n.1) + man (n.).

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mathematician (n.)

"one skilled or learned in mathematics," early 15c., mathematicion, from Old French mathematicien, from mathematique, from Latin mathematicus "of or belonging to mathematics," from Latin mathematica (see mathematic).

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songster (n.)

Old English sangystre "female singer;" see song (n.) + -ster. Also of men skilled in singing by mid-14c. Separate fem. form songstress is attested from 1703.

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artillerist (n.)

"person skilled in gunnery," 1778; see artillery + -ist. Artilleryman is from 1630s. Middle English had artiller "maker of arms" (mid-15c.), from Old French artiller.

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