Etymology
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denarius (n.)

ancient Roman silver coin, 1570s, from Latin denarius, noun use of adjective meaning "containing ten," and short for denarius nummus "the coin containing ten (aces)," from deni- "by tens," from decem "ten" (from PIE root *dekm- "ten"). In English money reckoning, "a penny," this having been, like the Roman denarius, the largest silver coin (hence d for "pence" in l.s.d.).

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half-dime (n.)

U.S. silver coin minted from 1792 to 1873; originally half-disme; later form by 1800; from half + dime.

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pringle (n.)

"small silver coin of about the value of a penny," formerly current in Scotland and northern England, 1680s, a word of unknown origin.

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mercury (n.)

silver-white fluid metallic element, late 14c., from Medieval Latin mercurius, from Latin Mercurius (see Mercury). Prepared in ancient times from cinnabar, it was one of the seven metals (bodies terrestrial) known to the ancients, which were coupled in astrology and alchemy with the seven known heavenly bodies. This one probably was associated with the planet for its mobility. The others were Sun/gold, Moon/silver, Mars/iron, Saturn/lead, Jupiter/tin, Venus/copper.

The Greek name for it was hydrargyros "liquid silver," which gives the element its symbol, Hg. Compare quicksilver, which is its popular name. It has a freezing point of -39° C. The use of the word in reference to temperature or state of the atmosphere (by 1756) is from its use in thermometers and barometers.

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galena (n.)

lead ore, lead sulphide, c. 1600, from Latin galena "mix of silver and lead; dross from smelting lead," of unknown origin. Related: Galenic.

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peseta (n.)

silver coin of Spain and some Spanish-American countries, 1811, from Spanish peseta, a diminutive of pesa "weight," from Medieval Latin pensum (see peso).

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pennyweight (n.)

unit of measure equal to the weight of one penny, Old English penega gewiht, originally the weight of a silver penny (22 grains); see penny + weight (n.).

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electroplate (n.)

"articles coated with silver or other metal by the process of electroplating," 1844, from electro- + plate (n.). As a verb by 1870.

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purl (v.1)

"knit with inverted stitches," 1825; earlier "embroider with gold or silver thread" (1520s), probably from Middle English pirlyng "revolving, twisting," of unknown origin. The two senses usually are taken as one word, but even this is not certain. Klein suggests a source in Italian pirolare "to twirl," from pirolo "top." As a noun, from late 14c. as "bordering, frills;" 1530s as "twisted thread of gold and silver."

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rupee (n.)

Indian coin, the standard unit of value, 1610s, from Hindi or Urdu rupiyah, from Sanskrit rupyah "wrought silver," perhaps originally "something provided with an image, a coin," from rupah "shape, likeness, image."

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