Etymology
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beforehand (adv.)
also before-hand, "in anticipation," early 13c., from before + hand, which here is of uncertain signification, unless the original notion is payment in advance or something done before another's hand does it. Hyphenated from 18c.; one word from 19c.
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semantics (n.)

"the study of meaning in language; the science of the relationship between linguistic symbols and their meanings," 1893, from French sémantique (1883); see semantic (also see -ics). In this sense it replaced semasiology (1847), from German Semasiologie (1829), from Greek sēmasia "signification, meaning."

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tallboy (n.)
also tall-boy, "high-stemmed glass or goblet," 1670s, from tall + boy, though the exact signification is unclear. In reference to a high chest of drawers it is recorded from 1769, here perhaps a partial loan-translation of French haut bois, literally "high wood."
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grinder (n.)
Old English grindere "one who grinds (grain);" agent noun from grind (v.). Meaning "molar tooth" is late 14c. (Old English had grindetoð). Meaning "machine for milling" is from 1660s; of persons, from late 15c. "Large sandwich" sense is from 1954, American English, though the exact signification is uncertain (perhaps from the amount of chewing required to eat one).
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fuzz (n.)
1590s, fusse, first attested in fusball "puff ball of tiny spores," of uncertain origin; perhaps a back-formation from fuzzy, if that word is older than the record of it. Meaning "the police" is American English, 1929, underworld slang; origin, signification, and connection to the older word unknown. Perhaps a variant of fuss, with a notion of "hard to please."
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pretension (n.)

mid-15c., pretensioun, "assertion, allegation; objection; intention; signification," from Medieval Latin pretensionem (nominative pretensio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin praetendere "stretch in front, put forward, allege" (see pretend (v.)).

Meaning "unproven claim" is from c. 1600. The sense of "ostentation" is from 1727, from the notion of "act of putting forth a (false) claim to merit, dignity, or importance."

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draw (n.)

c. 1400, "act of pulling," from draw (v.). Meaning "game or contest that ends without a winner," is attested first in drawn match (1610s), but the signification is uncertain origin; some speculate it is from withdraw. Hence, as a verb, "to leave (a game, etc.) undecided," from 1837.

Colloquial sense of "anything that can draw a crowd" is from 1881 (from the verb in the related sense). 

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book (v.)
Origin and meaning of book
Old English bocian "to grant or assign by charter," from book (n.). Meaning "to enter into a book, record" is early 13c. Meaning "to register a name for a seat or place; issue (railway) tickets" is from 1841; "to engage a performer as a guest" is from 1872. U.S. student slang meaning "to depart hastily, go fast" is by 1977, of uncertain signification. Related: Booked; booking.
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equivocate (v.)

"use words of a doubtful signification, express one's opinions in terms which admit of different interpretations," early 15c., equivocaten, from Medieval Latin equivocatus, past participle of equivocare "to call by the same name, be called by the same name, have the same sound," from Late Latin aequivocus "of identical sound" (see equivocation). Related: Equivocated; equivocating.

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analogous (adj.)

"corresponding (to some other) in particulars," 1640s, from Latin analogus, from Greek analogos "proportionate, according to due proportion," from ana "throughout; according to" (see ana-) + logos "ratio, proportion," a specialized use (see Logos). Used with to or with.

A term is analogous whose single signification applies with equal propriety to more than one object: as, the leg of the table, the leg of the animal. [William Flemming, "The Vocabulary of Philosophy," 1858]
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