Etymology
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sidestep (n.)
also side-step, 1757, "a stepping to the side" (originally in military drill), from side (adj.) + step (n.). The verb is recorded from 1895; the figurative sense is attested from 1900.
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sidelight (n.)
also side-light, c. 1600, "light coming from the side," from side (adj.) + light (n.). Figurative meaning "incidental information on a subject" is attested from 1862.
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offside (adj.)

also off-side, offsides, "on the wrong side;" from off (prep.) + side (n.). From 1867 in various sporting senses, originally in English football, between the ball and the opponent's goal during play.  

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lateral (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the side," early 15c., from Old French latéral (14c.) and directly from Latin lateralis "belonging to the side," from latus (genitive lateris) "the side, flank of humans or animals, lateral surface," a word of uncertain origin. Specific sense "situated on either side of the median vertical longitudinal plane of the body" [Century Dictionary] is from 1722.

As a noun, from 1630s, "a side part;" as a type of pass to the side in U.S. football, it is attested from 1934 (short for lateral pass). Related: Laterally.

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sidearms (n.)
also side-arms, 1760, from side (adj.) + plural of arm (n.2).
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wayside (n.)
"the side of the road," c. 1400, from way (n.) + side (n.). To fall by the wayside is from Luke viii.5.
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jarring (adj.)
"having a sharp, unpleasant effect," 1550s, present-participle adjective from jar (v.). Related: Jarringly.
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parataxis (n.)

"the placing of clauses one after another without connecting words to indicate their relation," 1838, from Greek parataxis "a placing side by side, a placing in line of battle," from stem of paratassein "to place side by side," from para- "beside" (see para- (1)) + tassein "to arrange" (see tactics). Related: Paratactic.

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athwart (adv.)
"crosswise, from side to side," late 15c., from a- (1) + thwart (v.). In nautical use, "across the line of a ship's course."
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efficacious (adj.)
"sure to have the desired effect" (often of medicines), 1520s, from Latin efficaci-, stem of efficax "powerful, effectual, efficient," from stem of efficere "work out, accomplish" (see effect (n.)) + -ous. Related: Efficaciously; efficaciousness.
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