Etymology
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mud-bath (n.)

"mud transfused with saline or other ingredients at mineral springs, into which patients suffering from rheumatism, etc., immerse themselves," 1798, from mud (n.) + bath (n.).

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short-lived (adj.)

"having a brief existence, not being in long continuance," 1580s, from short (adj.) + past tense of live (v.). A Middle English manuscript has short-livi "short-lived" (mid-13c.).

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short-term (adj.)

"lasting for or pertaining to a relatively brief period of time," by 1876, from the noun phrase; see short (adj.) + term (n.).

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short-order (adj.)

in restaurants, indicating dishes to be prepared and served up quickly, by 1897, from the adverbial expression in short order "rapidly, with no fuss;" see short (adj.) + order (n.).

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short-hair (n.)

type of domestic cat, by 1890, abbreviated from short-hair cat, from short (adj.) + hair (n.).

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short-sleeve (n.)

"sleeve which does not reach past the elbow," 1630s, from short (adj.) + sleeve. First recorded in an ordinance of Massachusetts Bay colony, forbidding "short sleeves, whereby the nakedness of the arme may be discovered." Related: Short-sleeved.

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short-handed (adj.)

also shorthanded, "having too few 'hands,' not having the necessary number of workers or assistants," 1794, from short (adj.) + -handed. The ice hockey sense is attested from 1939.

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short-staff (n.)

1775, "a short cudgel used in a two-person fight," from short (adj.) + staff (n.). To be short-staffed "not adequately provided with personnel," is by 1953, from staff in the "group of employees" sense.

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short-staple (adj.)

"having the fiber short," especially of cotton, 1802; see short (adj.) + staple (n.).

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shortstop (n.)

also short-stop, 1837 in cricket ("player stationed behind the wicket-keeper at about 45 degrees to the wicket"); 1857 in baseball ("player stationed between second and third base"); from short (adj.) + stop (n.). In cricket there is a longstop, but in baseball there is none.

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