Etymology
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windbreaker (n.)
type of jacket to keep off the wind (originally a kind of leather shirt), 1918, from wind (n.1) + agent noun from break (v.).
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camisole (n.)

1816, "short, light garment with sleeves," formerly worn by women as morning-dress, from French camisole (16c.), from Provençal camisola "mantle," diminutive of camisa "shirt," from Late Latin camisia "shirt, nightgown" (see chemise). In modern use a sleeveless undergarment for women (1900). In late 19c. it generally meant "strait-jacket, a restraint for lunatics."

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stuffed (adj.)

mid-15c., in reference to garments, "padded with stuffing," past-participle adjective from stuff (v.). Hence stuffed shirt "pompous, ineffectual person" (1913).

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dicky (n.)

also dickie, dickey, a diminutive form of dick, used in a variety of senses whose origin, application, and connection are more or less obscure. These include: "detached shirt front worn in place of a shirt" (1811); "a leather apron" (1874); "a donkey" (1793); "a small bird," (1851, short for dicky-bird, a nursery-word attested from 1781); "seat in a carriage on which the driver sits" (1801). For at least the garment senses Century Dictionary suggests Dutch dek "a cover, a horse-cloth."

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panty-waist (n.)

also pantywaist, "weak or effeminate male," 1936, from a type of child's garment with short pants that buttoned to the waist of a shirt; see panties + waist.

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neck-band (n.)

1590s, "part of a shirt which encircles the neck," from neck (n.) + band (n.1). Earlier it meant "band for the neck of an animal" (mid-15c.).

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Sturmabteilung (n.)
1923, from German, literally "storm detachment;" paramilitary force of the Nazi Party, founded 1921, repressed 1934, also know by its initials, S.A.; also see Brown Shirt.
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tunicate (adj.)
1760, from Latin tunicatus "clothed with a tunic only (i.e. without a toga), in shirt-sleeves," past participle of tunicare "to clothe in a tunic," from tunica (see tunic). As a noun, from 1848.
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Hawaii 
from Hawaiian Hawai'i, from Proto-Polynesian *hawaiki. Said to mean "Place of the Gods" and be a reference to Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa. See also sandwich. Related: Hawaiian (1825). First record of Hawaiian shirt is from 1943.
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button (v.)
late 14c., "to furnish with buttons;" early 15c., "to fasten with buttons" (of a garment,) from button (n.) or from Old French botoner (Modern French boutonner), from boton (n.) "button," which is from the same Germanic source as the English word. Related: Buttoned; buttoning. Button-down (adj.) in reference to shirt collars is from 1916.
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