Etymology
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shorn (adj.)

"shaven," late Old English scoren, strong past-participle adjective from shear (v.). Originally of clerics; by 1510s of sheep.

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ram (n.)

Old English ramm "male sheep," also "battering ram, instrument for crushing or driving by impact," and the zodiac sign; earlier rom "male sheep," a West Germanic word (cognates: Middle Low German, Middle Dutch, Dutch, Old High German ram), of unknown origin. Perhaps [Klein] connected with Old Norse rammr "strong," Old Church Slavonic ramenu "impetuous, violent."

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drover (n.)

"one who drives cattle or sheep to market," early 15c. (late 13c. as a surname), agent noun from drove (n.).

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cimarron (n.)

"bighorn, Rocky Mountain sheep," 1850, from American Spanish, from an adjective, literally "wild, unruly;" see maroon (v.). 

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Shetland 

group of islands north of Scotland, from Old Norse Hjaltland; in reference to a type of pony, 1801; as a breed of sheep, 1794. Related: Shetlander.

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shepherd (v.)

1790, "to tend, guard, and watch sheep," from shepherd (n.). The metaphoric sense of "watch over or guide" is attested by 1820. Related: Shepherded; shepherding.

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Cotswold 

range of hills in Gloucestershire, literally "wold where there are sheep-cotes;" see cote + wold. Related: Cotswolds.

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mouton enrage (n.)

"A normally calm person who has become suddenly enraged or violent" [OED], 1932, from French mouton enragé, literally "angry sheep." See mutton + enrage.

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shepherdess (n.)

"female keeper of sheep," also "wife of a shepherd; a rural lass," late 14c. (early 14c. as a surname), from shepherd (n.) + -ess.

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mutton (n.)

"flesh of sheep used as food," c. 1300, mouton (c. 1200 as a surname), from Old French moton "mutton; ram, wether, sheep" (12c., Modern French mouton), from Medieval Latin multonem (8c.), probably [OED] from Gallo-Roman *multo-s, accusative of Celtic *multo "sheep" (source also of Old Irish molt "wether," Mid-Breton mout, Welsh mollt), which is perhaps from PIE root *mel- (1) "soft."

The same word also was borrowed into Italian as montone "a sheep," and mutton in Middle English also could mean "a sheep" (early 14c.). Transferred slang sense of "food for lust, loose women, prostitutes" (1510s) led to extensive British slang uses down to the present day for woman variously regarded as seeking lovers or as lust objects. Mutton chop "cut of mutton (usually containing a rib) for cooking" is from 1720; as a style of side whiskers from 1865, so called for the shape (narrow and prolonged at one end and rounded at the other). Shoulder of mutton as a common food figures largely in the 17c.-19c. English imagination and is the source of a number of images and proverbs; sails and land-parcels were named for the shape of it.

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