Etymology
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dishonor (n.)

c. 1300, "want of honor in conduct; state of being disgraced; a violation of one's honor or dignity," from Old French deshonor (12c., Modern French déshonneur), from deshonorer (see dishonor (v.)). Meaning "a cause or source of shame" is from 1550s.

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alack (interj.)
expression of sorrow or dismay, mid-15c. contraction of ah, lack, which according to Skeat is from lack (n.) in its secondary Middle English sense of "loss, failure, fault, reproach, shame." According to OED, originally an expression of dissatisfaction, later of regret or unpleasant surprise. Sometimes extended as alackaday ("alack the day").
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disgrace (v.)
Origin and meaning of disgrace

1550s, "disfigure, deprive of (outward) grace," a sense now obsolete; 1590s, "put out of favor, dismiss with discredit," also "bring shame or reproach upon" from French disgracier (16c.), from Italian disgraziare, from disgrazia "misfortune, deformity," from dis- "opposite of" (see dis-) + grazia "grace" (see grace (n.)). Related: Disgraced; disgracing.

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pudeur (n.)

"modesty," especially in sexual matters, 1937, a French word in English, from French pudeur "modesty," from Latin pudor "shame, modesty," from pudere "make ashamed" (see pudendum). The same word had been borrowed into English directly from Latin as pudor (1620s), but this became obsolete.

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abash (v.)

"perplex or embarrass by suddenly exciting the conscience, discomfit, make ashamed," late 14c., earlier "lose one's composure, be upset" (early 14c.), from Old French esbaiss-, present stem of esbaer "lose one's composure, be startled, be stunned."

Originally, to put to confusion from any strong emotion, whether of fear, of wonder, shame, or admiration, but restricted in modern times to effect of shame. [Hensleigh Wedgwood, "A Dictionary of English Etymology," 1859]

The first element is es "out" (from Latin ex; see ex-). The second may be ba(y)er "to be open, gape" (if the notion is "gaping with astonishment"), possibly ultimately imitative of opening the lips. Middle English Compendium also compares Old French abaissier "bow, diminish, lower oneself" (source of abase). Related: Abashed; abashing. Bashful is a 16c. derivative.

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Moloch 

Canaanite god frequently mentioned in Scripture, said to have been propitiated by sacrificing children (Leviticus xviii.21), from Latin Moloch, from Greek Molokh, from Hebrew molekh, from melekh "king," altered by the Jews with the vowel points from basheth "shame" to express their horror of the worship. Hence, figuratively, "any baleful influence to which everything is sacrificed" (1799).

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discountenance (v.)

1570s, "put to shame," a sense now obsolete; 1590s "show disapprobation of," hence "discourage, check, or restrain," etymologically "set the countenance against," from French descontenancer "to abash," literally "put out of countenance" (16c., Modern French décontenancer), from des- "off, away" (see dis-) + contenancer "to behave (a certain way)," from Old French contenance "demeanor, bearing, conduct," from Latin continentia "way one contains oneself" (see countenance (n.)).

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dishonesty (n.)

late 14c., "disgrace, shame, want of honor," from Old French deshonesté (13c., Modern French deshonnéteté) "dishonor, impropriety," from des- (see dis-) + Latin honestatem (nominative honestas) "honorableness," from honestus "honorable; deserving honor, respectable," from honos "honor, dignity, office, reputation," which is of unknown origin. Meaning "want of honesty, lack of integrity," the main modern sense, is recorded from 1590s.

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pudendum (n.)

"external genitals," often specifically "the vulva," late 14c. (pudenda), from Latin pudendum (plural pudenda), literally "thing to be ashamed of," neuter gerundive of pudere "make ashamed; be ashamed," sometimes said to be from a PIE root *(s)peud- "to punish, repulse," or else "to press, hurry," but de Vaan is doubtful. Translated into Old English as scamlim ("shame-limb"); in Middle English it also was Englished as pudende "male genitals" (late 14c.). Related: Pudendal.

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cower (v.)

early 14c., "to crouch, squat, or kneel;" late 14c., "to stoop or sink down, especially in fear or shame," probably from Middle Low German *kuren "lie in wait" (Modern German kauern), or similar Scandinavian words meaning "to squat" and "to doze" (such as Old Norse kura, Danish, Norwegian kure, Swedish kura). Thus it is unrelated to coward. Related: Cowered; cowering.

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